Transitioning to 2011 Priorities

There are many ramifications from the state and local government election results this week, such as this article which highlights new Governors to bring big turnover of State CIOs. So what should current (or prospective) government technology professionals be doing now to prepare for 2011?

by / November 5, 2010 0

 There are many ramifications from the state and local government election results this week, such as this article which highlights new Governors to bring big turnover of State CIOs.  So what should current (or prospective) government technology professionals be doing now to prepare for 2011?

 One place to start is the National Association of State CIOs (NASCIO) latest priority list. Here’s a quick peek at the top five priority strategies for 2011:  

1. Consolidation / Optimization

2. Budget and Cost Control

3. Health Care

4. Cloud Computing

5. Shared Services

 

The top five priority technologies for 2011 include:  

 

1. Virtualization (servers, storage, computing, data center)

2. Cloud computing (software as a service, infrastructure, applications, storage)

3. Networking (voice and data communications, unified communications)

4. Legacy application modernization / renovation

5. Identity and access management

 

I also recommend reading this Governing article on Managing Through a Transition, which was written by the well-respected Scott Pattison back in 2006, but is still just as relevant today.

 

Another document worth reading is this “issue brief” from the National Governor’s Association (NGA) Center for Best Practices on state government redesign efforts in 2009 and 2010.  

 

Of course, all politics are local, so understanding the priorities from the incoming elected officials is vital.

 

It’s a good idea to visit the website of our soon-to-be leaders and read about their plans and approaches. Some websites even solicit ideas and take resumes.

 

Here are a few examples: Governor-elect Rick Snyder in Michigan     

                                       Governor-elect Rick Scott in Florida &

                                       Governor-elect Neil Abercrombie in Hawaii

 

What are your thoughts on transition planning or planning for 2011 and beyond?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dan Lohrmann Chief Security Officer & Chief Strategist at Security Mentor Inc.

DAN LOHRMANN

Daniel J. Lohrmann is an internationally recognized cybersecurity leader, technologist, keynote speaker and author.

During his distinguished career, he has served global organizations in the public and private sectors in a variety of executive leadership capacities, receiving numerous national awards including: CSO of the Year, Public Official of the Year and Computerworld Premier 100 IT Leader.
Lohrmann led Michigan government’s cybersecurity and technology infrastructure teams from May 2002 to August 2014, including enterprisewide Chief Security Officer (CSO), Chief Technology Officer (CTO) and Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) roles in Michigan.

He currently serves as the Chief Security Officer (CSO) and Chief Strategist for Security Mentor Inc. He is leading the development and implementation of Security Mentor’s industry-leading cyber training, consulting and workshops for end users, managers and executives in the public and private sectors. He has advised senior leaders at the White House, National Governors Association (NGA), National Association of State CIOs (NASCIO), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), federal, state and local government agencies, Fortune 500 companies, small businesses and nonprofit institutions.

He has more than 30 years of experience in the computer industry, beginning his career with the National Security Agency. He worked for three years in England as a senior network engineer for Lockheed Martin (formerly Loral Aerospace) and for four years as a technical director for ManTech International in a US/UK military facility.

Lohrmann is the author of two books: Virtual Integrity: Faithfully Navigating the Brave New Web and BYOD for You: The Guide to Bring Your Own Device to Work. He has been a keynote speaker at global security and technology conferences from South Africa to Dubai and from Washington, D.C., to Moscow.

He holds a master's degree in computer science (CS) from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and a bachelor's degree in CS from Valparaiso University in Indiana.

Follow Lohrmann on Twitter at: @govcso