The Center for Digital Government, in conjunction with the Progress & Freedom Foundation and Government Technology Magazine, conducted the 2000 Digital State Survey. This yearlong, four-part study, sponsored by Compaq Computer Corporation, explored eight areas of technology application in the 50 states: electronic commerce, taxation/revenue, social services, law enforcement and the courts, digital democracy, management/administration, higher education and K-12 education.

Each quarter throughout the year, survey results from two of the eight categories were released with the top-10 ranked states in each category featured in Government Technology magazine. Results from the 2000 Digital State Survey are featured below.

PART I -- Electronic Commerce and Taxation/Revenue

This is the first of four installments in the yearlong survey, which explored eight areas of technology applications in the 50 states. Phase I of the survey focused on Electronic Commerce and Taxation/Revenue.

Survey results in the Electronic Commerce category reveal what services are available online for citizens, if citizens can actually file or apply for a license online, if citizens can receive online customer service through a state employee, and more.

The Taxation/Revenue category shows which states allow taxpayers to download and submit tax forms online, customer service availability online, and if states use a digital system to record, store and retrieve tax records.

View State Ranking Results for Phase I.

PART II -- Social Services and Law Enforcement & the Courts

This is the second of four installments in the yearlong survey, which is exploring technology applications in eight areas of government in the 50 states. Phase II of the survey focused on social services and law enforcement & the courts.

In the social services category, survey results revealed the progress made by states in online services to citizens, such as benefits, applications, employment opportunities, electronic benefit transfers, intranet developments, and more.

In the area of law enforcement & the courts, the survey uncovered achievements made by the states in utilizing digital mobile technologies, systems, video teleconferencing, accessing court opinion online, and more.

View State Ranking Results for Phase II.

PART III: Digital Democracy and Management/Administration

Phase III of the survey focused on Digital Democracy and Management/Administration.

In the Digital Democracy category, survey results reveal states' activities and efforts in providing online access to legislative decisions, election materials and voting, proceedings, information on lobbyists, judicial branch agencies, and more.

In the area of Management/Administration, survey results highlight states' Information Technology commissions, policy boards and councils that oversee IT policies and procedures. The survey also reveals where states are at in developing intranets and portals, statewide architectures, and more.

View State Ranking Results for Phase III.

PART IV: Higher Education and Elementary & Secondary education

This is the fourth and final installment in the yearlong survey, which explored eights areas of technology application in the 50 states. Phase IV of the survey focused on Higher Education and K-12 Education.

Survey results in the Higher Education category reveal which state universities provide students with online access to administrative functions; which have formal intellectual properties around course curriculum relating to the Internet; and which provide distance education courses.

The K-12 Education category shows which states require technology training as part of standard teacher education curriculum and certification; what percent of students have high-speed access to online learning resources; and if state education resources support projects that encourage innovative use of technology.

View State Ranking Results for Phase IV.

View Final State Ranking Results.