How Governments are Changing Application Design Using Solid State Drives

Intel's Chuck Brown explains that solid state drives are enabling governments to accelerate existing applications, such as ERP systems and databases, and also to support the storage necessary to move applications into the cloud and virtualized environments.

by / October 6, 2016
Image via YouTube

Image via YouTube

Solid state drives (SSDs) are becoming more common as an alternative to hard disk drives (HDDs) in laptops, desktops, and server and storage arrays. SSDs store data on flash memory instead of the spinning read-write head on a traditional drive, and one of the biggest advantages of SSDs is that they're much faster.

In this interview with TechWire, sister publication of Government Technology, Intel's Chuck Brown, who manages the company's SSD product line for data centers, explains that SSDs are enabling governments to accelerate existing applications, such as ERP systems and databases, and also to support the storage necessary to move applications into the cloud and virtualized environments.

Some applications don't run well on traditional storage, Brown said. That's where SSDs come into play.

"I can virtualize not only my computer, but my storage — and in the future, networking and bring that all together to run the variety of applications around analytics and big data [and] databases, all of the things that are essential to any agency to run," Brown said.



Learn more about SSDs in another video where Brown describes how applications used to be delivered and compares that to what the future could hold.

This story was originally published by TechWire.

Matt Williams Contributing Writer

Matt Williams was previously the news editor of Govtech.com, and is now a contributor to Government Technology and Public CIO magazines. He also previously served as the managing editor of TechWire, a sister publication to Government Technology.2