Moving Off Mainframe

Tennessee Deputy CIO Stephanie Dedmon discusses the ongoing process of modernizing legacy systems.

by , / August 3, 2018

Emerging technology gets a lot of attention. Talking about pilot projects and use cases for artificial intelligence and drones in government is an exciting look at the future of how states, cities and counties can better achieve their core missions. 

But what many public-sector tech leaders know is that beneath all of the well-deserved buzz generated around these forward-looking projects remains the legacy systems of gov tech: the mainframes, the data centers, the paper processes that government is in many cases looking to move away from in favor of the cloud and other digital options. 

At the National Association of State Chief Information Officers (NASCIO) Midyear Conference in April, GT talked to state CIOs about both sides of this coin. Tennessee Deputy CIO Stephanie Dedmon touched on projects like using data-driven policy to make headway on the opioid crisis and help decrease traffic incidents, but when asked what technology she’d like to get out of her state’s portfolio, she pointed to a need to keep modernizing and moving away from legacy systems and applications. 

Dedmon, a 2018 Government Technology Top 25 Doer, Dreamer and Driver, discussed the ongoing process of moving Tennessee’s agencies to newer technologies, which will likely set the stage for some of those more headline-grabbing projects.

Lauren Harrison Managing Editor

Lauren Harrison is the managing editor for Government Technology magazine. She has a degree in English from the University of California, Berkeley, and more than 10 years’ experience in book and magazine publishing.

Noelle Knell Editor

Government Technology editor Noelle Knell has more than 15 years of writing and editing experience, covering public projects, transportation, business and technology. A California native, she has worked in both state and local government, and is a graduate of the University of California, Davis, with majors in political science and American history. She can be reached via email and on Twitter.