Articles

Virginia County's Emergency Communications Center Simplifies Operations

Arlington County eases maintenance while reducing heat and noise for dispatchers.

by / September 29, 2009

In April 1993, Arlington County, Va., grouped its emergency communications capabilities into a single state-of-the-art Emergency Communications Center. But after little more than a decade, it was no longer state-of-the-art, so in May 2008 the county unveiled a new and considerably improved version.

With three times the prior footprint, the new 8,000-square-foot facility accommodates 24 positions, a video wall that can tap 250 feeds, a new digital radio system and three times as many 911 lines.

The new computer network configuration dramatically reduces heat and noise, and simplifies system operation and maintenance.

Computers have been relocated away from the operator area to a separate space where they are all within an administrator's easy reach. Previously one or more computers would be crowded into a single workspace. When troubles arose, administrators had to get down on their hands and knees in a hot and crowded space to untangle wires and attempt to address the problem.

By removing PCs from the work area, the system allows IT staff to remediate problems more easily. Remote location of PCs also lets administrators access and maintain these systems without intruding on dispatchers' work environment, a potentially significant benefit in an atmosphere already buzzing with urgent activity. The removal of PCs from the work floor also helps administrators guarantee a certain level of privacy and security.

 

Visit Emergency Management to read the entire story.

 

Adam Stone Contributing Writer

A seasoned journalist with 20+ years' experience, Adam Stone covers education, technology, government and the military, along with diverse other topics. His work has appeared in dozens of general and niche publications nationwide.