The revolutionary city! This is not a city under siege or under threat by terrorists. This is a city that uses all its efforts to understand, strategically plan for and actively position itself to truly transform and actively apply all of the ICT enabled opportunities and all of the smart systems and infrastructure at its disposal to allow its citizens to benefit from efficiencies, security, conveniences, experiences and opportunities available to them. It is also a city that works with its universities and all other educational institutions to be able to benefit from the knowledge, talent and resources available to them to help position the community with a knowledge-centric focus. This is a city where all its bureaucrats and other leaders pull together with a sense of collaboration; use all their efforts to be transparent though excellence in public policy; and create clear, concise and visionary directions for its community that all can embrace and act upon. This is a community that embraces an innovation and creativity ecosystem and is caring and sensitive to issues of health, environmental sustainability, safety and fairness to everyone. This is a community that an investor or someone with significant talent decides on with confidence.

Here are some well-planned cities that provide the confidence to companies and talented people to invest in: San Francisco, New York, Suwon, Taipei, Singapore, Melbourne, Toronto, Manchester, Chattanooga, Waterloo, Dundee, Austin, Stratford, Eindhoven, Barcelona, Glasgow, Columbus, Philadephia, Calgary, Issy-les-Moulineaux (Paris), Mitaka (Tokyo), Gangnam (Seoul), Stockholm, Quebec City, Taichung, Winnipeg, Ottawa, plus 100 other Intelligent Communities.
 
These well-planned cities are all Intelligent Communities. Think of Intelligent Communities = Excellence in Urban Planning and Urban Design.
 
Providing deliberate certainty through well thought through and crafted policies, land use decisions and the basis for creating the best environments possible in our communities are key constructs of urban and regional planning. Hence the revolutionary communities of tomorrow are those that are well planned for and being developed as Intelligent Communities today.
 
What would make cities and regions truly revolutionary is if we could see the best of its urban and regional planning and urban design implemented, especially using all of the planning tools, ultra-high-speed broadband connectivity and related technologies available to them. These might be off the shelf and in some cases, leveraging entirely new innovations with new uses and applications to demonstrate pilots and create new concepts and experiences in urban liveability. But it would also require superb leadership and collaboration throughout and a special sense of the community nurturing an innovation ecosystem that would help to differentiate it as being among the best in the world. This would capture the imagination of investors, scholars and talented people to want to be part of these types of communities.
 
Urban planning is not a science; it’s a combination of the arts, science, philosophy, sociology, economics and politics. Its theories and practices, delivered in the form of plans are a reflection of a language focused on the use of land by its citizens and the design of the urban environment upon which the site is to be developed on as well as reflected in its impact on the surrounding area. But as planning concerns itself with everything around it - including air, water and infrastructure in, around and through it, it must take a true 360 degree, all-encompassing look at everything related to its development. Therefore it must even look at its history and current relationship with other neighbouring land-uses and the people and things around it. Just as Cisco speaks of the Internet of Everything, so does Urban Planning. Planners must consider everything that makes up a community (or at least it should) in making their planning recommendations. Like the concepts of sustainability – everything connects to everything else.
 
A plan is a statement of intent; if given the mandate by the leadership and the funds to see it through, it can be very powerful. Current planning directions range from Urbanism or New Urbanism, Intelligent Urbanism, Liveable Cities, and so forth. Whatever is currently vogue in different parts of the world, planners must consider in context all of the elements of their unique community they represent in order to successfully deliver and execute their plans. For instance, Urban Designers consider built form, colour, lighting, building materials, art and technology in context to the urban situation in which they are planning for as well as the relationship between buildings, uses, sight-lines and the physical ground spaces in three dimensional form. This is also akin to the idea of liveable cities in which good urban design principles can create a high quality of life in dense but well-designed urban environments, such as Singapore. Planners and their colleagues in city design, development and management today also employ Computer-aided Design (CAD), Geographic information Systems (GIS), leverage the Internet of Things technologies to design for managing mobility – especially during rush hour traffic and the demands of supply chain logistics; smart technologies to develop, monitor and analyze big data, especially as part of incorporating smart utilities and smart systems into their communities; high-speed broad applications that offer new community development unique communications, entertainment and other new urban experiences; produce 3D planning models for enhanced public engagement, including those who become involved via online and web-based experiences; and some are looking into future building design options through holography and visual-support technologies. Building or using traditional environments and installing new technologies create exciting new environments that create a new experience that attracts investors and talent to a place. For instance, traditional brick and beam environments and reused lofts as live/work spaces attract artists and software code writers alike as long as high-speed broadband applications are also planned for and incorporated into the design of the facilities. Traditional open space and bike paths incorporate technologies for communications, directions, safety, and exciting new environmental experiences, such as art applications utilizing advanced software technologies, broadband communications and advanced visual projection techniques. Artist Daan Roosegaarde’s Van Gogh inspired illuminated bikepath near Eindhoven, in the Netherlands, and Ryan Holladay’s BLUEBRAIN location-based music composition using smartphones are only the beginning of the type of new experiences that our revolutionary communities will be exploring. These and other capabilities in urban environments make urban spaces and experiences attractive to people who want to live and work in these environments. Accordingly, it’s not a surprise that attractive and highly–in-demand intelligent and revolutionary urban centers are growing at an incredible pace.
 
Considering that nearly 70% of the world’s population is expected to live in urban centers by 2050, planners are going to have to do more than traditional planning efforts to meet these demands. Intelligent Communities understand these challenges and are making great strides to undertake serious strategic planning that focus on highly efficient mobility of all kinds, connectivity, accommodating all types of housing needs and ensuring sustainable development approaches to be able to support these changes. Urban Planners must be at the forefront of these efforts. As such, they must also be at the forefront of developing their communities into intelligent and revolutionary communities.
John Jung  |  Co-founder of the Intelligent Community Forum

ICF co-founder John G. Jung originated the Intelligent Community concept and continues to serve as the Forum's leading visionary. Formerly President and CEO of the Greater Toronto Marketing Alliance and Calgary Economic Development Authority, he is a registered professional urban planner, urban designer and economic developer. He leads regular international business missions to US, European, Asian, Indian and Australian cities, and originated the ICF Immersion Lab program. John is a regular speaker at universities and conferences and serves as an advisor to regional and national leaders on Intelligent Community development. The author of numerous articles in planning and economic development journals, he has received global and Toronto-based awards for his work in collaboration and strategic development and sits on numerous task forces and international advisory boards.