Government Technology

Michigan and Utah Lead 50-State Report Card on Technology in Government




September 28, 2010 By

Michigan, Utah, Pennsylvania and Virginia received top grades in the 2010 Digital States Survey, a comprehensive examination of state government technology practices conducted by the Center for Digital Government, the research and advisory division of eRepublic, publisher of Government Technology.

The announcement Tuesday, Sept. 21, revealed those four states were the only recipients of “A” or “A-minus” grades in the survey, which is conducted every two years. Michigan and Utah received the highest scores. Conversely, only three states – Idaho, Indiana and South Carolina -- received “C-minus” grades, the lowest given among the 50 states.

Mouse over the U.S. map below to find each state’s grade for the 2010 Digital States Survey. Click on a state to view examples of selected best practices.

  • GRADE A

    These states are trending sharply up. They show results across all survey categories. Modernization is used to realize operational efficiencies and strategic priorities. They show evidence of meaningful collaboration. Performance measures and metrics are widely adopted. Cuts tend to be made strategically.

  • GRADE B

    These states are trending up. They show results in many categories. Leadership uses modernization to change entrenched practices and prepare for more sustainable operations. Collaboration incentives are in place. Measures are used in key areas. Cuts tend to be made across the board.

  • GRADE C

    These states are stable and demonstrating results in some survey categories. Modernization is used to realize operational efficiencies. This grade level includes states that launched reforms but have not fully harvested their results. Performance measures are uneven. Cuts have constrained progress.

50-State Report Card

ALABAMA

Grade: C

ALASKA

Grade: C+

ARIZONA

Grade: B

ARKANSAS

Grade: B

CALIFORNIA

Grade: B+

Best Practices

Enterprise IT: The Office of the State CIO reduced more than 75,000 square feet of data-center space in 12 months and found that the IT of five large agencies could co-locate in 5,000 square feet of an existing Tier III data center, saving more than $40 million in capital costs. Data center and telecom rates have already been reduced more than $100 million since 2006. The state also secured a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation grant for wireless access, which will bring more than 100 libraries up to a wireless speed of least 1.5 Mbps. Wi-Fi will extend to the parking lots for people to use even when libraries are closed, making public services available 24/7. The entire state soon will be on a single e-mail system, down from more than 100 different systems.

Open Government: This year, California launched what may be the nation’s first mobile portal for government. State officials credit the new portal with a 1,500 percent increase in the number of unique mobile visitors to the state website. The site had nearly 400,000 unique mobile visitors in the first five months of 2010, compared with 24,000 visitors in the previous six previous months. Along with the new mobile portal, the state created an application development tool kit that lets state agencies build and deploy mobile applications quickly. Proxy detection technology allows California’s state government portal (CA.gov) — which also received a major redesign this year — to automatically detect smartphone users and direct them to the mobile portal.

COLORADO

Grade: B+

Best Practice

Open Government: An interactive website called Colorado Tax Tracks gives individual citizens or families detailed information about how state tax dollars are used. Users enter their income and the system provides a report that shows an estimate of how much they spent on different government services. The site delivers tax spending information for nearly 100 functions of government — from clean drinking water inspections to disease control. Colorado also recently implemented the Transparency in Contribution and Expenditure Reporting Campaign Finance system, which allows citizens to view political candidates’ financial data and create reports a through a Web portal

CONNECTICUT

Grade: B-

DELAWARE

Grade: B-

FLORIDA

Grade: B-

GEORGIA

Grade: B-

HAWAII

Grade: B-

IDAHO

Grade: C-

ILLINOIS

Grade: B

Best Practice

Enterprise IT: In 2005, the state decommissioned 22 substandard data center/computer rooms resulting in a reduction of 22,800 square feet of data center floor space, while physically moving two mainframes and 1,364 servers to the two primarily data centers. The state also virtualized and decommissioned 854 aging servers and installed 190 new virtual servers for a total of 1,044 virtual servers managed today, increasing server processor utilization by more than 700 percent. The project has resulted in a 260 percent return on investment (ROI) totaling more than $10.7 million in net savings between July 2006 and May 2010. Illinois completed implementation of a private cloud e-mail service capable of supporting all state e-mail users. The net cost benefit/savings to the state between fiscal years 2005 and 2010 has been more than $13 million with a total ROI of more than 86 percent.

INDIANA

Grade: C-

IOWA

Grade: C+

KANSAS

Grade: B

Best Practice

Finance and Administration: The Kansas departments of Revenue and Labor worked together to implement a multiagency website for the reporting of misclassification of workers, which occurs when an employer incorrectly classifies workers as independent contractors rather than employees. Consequently employers may not make appropriate withholdings or tax payments for their employees. The intentional misclassification of workers is illegal and constitutes tax and insurance evasion. The departments developed a joint electronic system to share information on those suspected of intentionally misclassifying employees. It allows for more collaboration between the two agencies in investigating these matters, which should dramatically enhance enforcement.

KENTUCKY

Grade: B+

LOUISIANA

Grade: B

MAINE

Grade: C+

MARYLAND

Grade: B

Best Practices

Health and Human Services: Maryland’s ESSENCE (Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-Based Epidemics) is a Web-based surveillance system developed by the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) in partnership with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab. This real-time biosurveillance system monitors for the early detection of disease outbreaks, suspicious patterns of illness and public health emergencies, including possible bioterrorism attacks. Data from various sources, including hospital emergency departments, poison control centers, and private pharmacies selling specific over-the-counter medications, are reported electronically to ESSENCE and analyzed daily by epidemiologists at the DHMH. The system was expanded last year from 29 to 75 hospitals, resulting in the full participation of Maryland’s acute-care hospitals in a unified biosurveillance system.

Open Government: Maryland’s Funding Accountability and Transparency website (http://spending.dbm.maryland.gov/) provides detailed information on state spending and grants for the prior fiscal year. Users may search the site by the name of the agency making the payment, the name of the vendor receiving a payment or the ZIP code of the vendor receiving the payment. Maryland also launched two environmental transparency sites. Maryland GreenPrint (http://www.greenprint.maryland.gov/) is designed to demonstrate the ecological value of every parcel of land within the state. This interactive site lets citizens track the governor’s land preservation efforts. A companion site — Maryland AgPrint (http://www.agprint.maryland.gov/) — allows users to analyze the state’s natural resource lands and resource conservation lands outside of targeted development areas. Both GreenPrint and AgPrint were developed in concert with Maryland iMAP, the official statewide GIS base map.

MASSACHUSETTS

Grade: B

MICHIGAN

Grade: A

Best Practices

Enterprise IT: Michigan’s fully consolidated computing environment supports all the state’s essential functions. This streamlined approach has led to a 15 percent reduction in the number of state employees, a 64 percent reduction in contractors, 40 disparate data centers streamlined into three secured hosting centers. The state has gone from 700 e-mail servers to 70, and 70 e-mail versions to two (moving to one). Michigan achieved a 20-to-1 ratio of implementing virtual environments over physical installations, resulting in 25 percent cost savings to date. Michigan is piloting its MiCloud infrastructure to offer storage as a service to public clients (using a pay-as-you-go model). About 1,200 sites have been converted to wireless local area networks. Approximately 13,000 users across 140 remote office locations have been converted to the new IP telephony service.

Energy and Transportation: More than 50 percent of Michigan’s workers in the departments Agriculture and Natural Resources and Environment are mobile. Technology, automation and self-service are improving operations, saving dollars and allowing the state to repurpose staff to other mission-critical activities. The Integrated Forest Monitoring, Assessment and Prescription system’s mobile application enabled Michigan Forest Finance Authority examiners to record inventory data electronically on mobile devices while conducting site visits, saving up to 3,520 hours per year. USAHerds uses radio-frequency identification devices and electronic readers to track cattle movement from farm to slaughter facility to market. Mi-HUNT is a cutting-edge mapping solution that allows users to view and navigate all public lands open to hunting and trapping in Michigan. The state also implemented a mobile solution to allow anglers to purchase a 24-hour fishing license with any Web-enabled mobile device.

Commerce, Labor and Tax: Michigan has led the nation with 45 consecutive months with the highest unemployment rate. To address this, Michigan rapidly developed improved processes, mitigation strategies, and answers to short- and long-term structural and work force issues such as a Claim Portal/Citizen Self-Service, which allows citizens to create secure personalized accounts, track benefits, make changes and respond to claims questions. The state’s Emergency Command Center was repurposed to expedite an immediate call center expansion. Within 15 months of implementation, 25 percent of unemployment certification was performed online. The state also launched Unemployment Insurance Tube with more than 50 on-demand webinars for unemployed workers and employers. It provides a marketing tool for online services, a training tool and general unemployment information. It receives about 10,000 views per month.

Health and Human Services: In 2009, Michigan deployed two new computer systems that govern all eligibility determination and benefit processing for federally subsidized human services programs. Known as Bridges — which handles eligibility determination — and CHAMPS (the Community Health Automated Medicaid Processing System) — which processes Medicaid payments — these systems provide cash assistance, food stamps, health care and other vital social services for more than 2.2 million Michigan residents. Benefits of the new technology include an increase in the food-stamp participation rate to 89 percent, the third best in the nation. Also, one assistance worker now handles 700 cases, up from 200 cases in 2006. Medicaid provider claims are also approved more quickly, thus increasing the number of health professionals willing to provide Medicaid services.

Finance and Administration: The 2009 creation of the Michigan Department of Technology, Management and Budget combined the state’s centralized IT organization with the depth, breadth and strength of its statewide management and budget operations. With this move, the state redefined the role, influence and ability of IT to improve internal operations. The department’s creation was the culmination of an aggressive restructuring and cost-cutting initiative to refocus the state on core priorities and maximize return on the state’s limited resources. The massive streamlining effort effectively eliminated three state departments. The merged department consolidated procurement, contract management, audit, finance, accounting, communications, facilities and policies, as well as expanded data management, security and other shared services.

MINNESOTA

Grade: B+

Best Practice

Energy and Transportation: The Minnesota Department of Transportation continues to expand the GPS Maintenance Decision Support System for winter operations, providing in-cab support, including current weathers conditions, forecasted weather events and recommendations for road treatment. The NexTrip customer information tool allows Twin Cities transit riders to check bus and train schedules by phone and online. Google maps will soon allow transit customers to access area transportation routes and create a transit itinerary, including detailed walking directions. The GIS and Web application What’s In My Neighborhood tracks potentially contaminated sites. This website contains a searchable inventory of those properties, as well as sites that have already been cleaned up and those currently being investigated or cleaned up.

MISSISSIPPI

Grade: B

Best Practice

Health and Human Services: Mississippi is using Recovery Act funding to plan and deploy a secure, statewide health information network. The Mississippi Health Information Network (MS-HIN) will interface with health care providers, public health organizations, and local and regional health information exchanges, as well as provide connectivity to the National Health Information Network. The MS-HIN will promote the use of certified electronic health records technology to improve quality, safety and efficiency of health-care delivery; reduce health-care disparities; engage patients and families; improve care coordination; and ensures adequate privacy and security protections for personal health information. Mississippi lawmakers passed legislation to create a 21-member MS-HIN board of directors to govern the project, reasonably reflecting the public-private and diverse nature of the MS-HIN. The public-private board will include appointees from the governor, lieutenant governor and speaker of the house, as well as representatives from a broad array of health-care organizations.

MISSOURI

Grade: B+

Best Practice

Commerce, Labor and Tax: Through the implementation of the Adobe Connect product, the Missouri Department of Revenue (DOR) has used webinars to conduct training for remotely located staff, as well as provide “just-in-time” training for centrally located staff. Missouri was one of the first five states that participated with Microsoft in a public-private partnership program called Elevate America. More than 24,000 e-learning skill development and training vouchers were claimed using an online application process developed by the Department of Economic Development. The DOR purchased and implemented an off-the-shelf tax compliance system solution involving two commercial third-party vendors that provided the hardware, software and consulting services necessary to implement the solution. So far it has generated $109 million for Missouri at an ROI of approximately 5-to-1.

MONTANA

Grade: C+

NEBRASKA

Grade: B-

NEVADA

Grade: C+

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Grade: C

NEW JERSEY

Grade: C+

NEW MEXICO

Grade: B-

NEW YORK

Grade: B+

Best Practices

Enterprise IT: New York’s counties and state agencies have partnered to streamline access to applications by using OneNetNYS, which provides faster, more secure and robust connectivity to state data center resources and other state agency applications. NYSeMail already serves as New York’s centralized e-mail and calendaring system for more than 25 state agencies. The three-phased approach began in February and will run to December 2011, transitioning nearly 43,000 mailboxes onto NYSeMail. In April 2009, New York entered into a multiyear, enterprise license agreement with McAfee to secure more than 250,000 servers, PCs and laptops. The agreement provided New York with improved security and will save approximately $20 million over three years.

Energy and Transportation: 511NY delivers automated traffic and travel feeds via e-alerts and social media tools such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr. The information is real time, available in one location and provides volumes of information to the public. New York is the first state to mandate the use of green cleaning products in schools. The Office of General Services developed an innovative website that features a tool to help prove that green cleaning products can be cost competitive with traditional cleaning products. In October 2009, the CIO/Office for Technology applied an Energy Star power-conservation setting to its desktop computers. The setting saves electricity by powering down the monitor after 15 minutes of inactivity and hibernating the desktop after 30 minutes of inactivity. This results in a savings of $34 per workstation per year.

Commerce, Labor and Tax: Empire 2.0 is a New York state government social media networking initiative designed to promote government participation, increase collaboration and expand the state’s ability to share information with social media users. The CIO/Office for Technology (OFT) launched Empire 2.0 in conjunction with the state’s first-ever Capitol Camp. The June 2009 inaugural “unconference,” co-sponsored by the New York State Senate and CIO/OFT, convened a diverse group of more than 100 people from government, business, nonprofits and the public to discuss using new social media communication technologies to improve government transparency and citizen participation. The Computational Center for Nanotechnology Innovations is a $100 million partnership — including the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, IBM and New York state — designed to continue advancing semiconductor technology to the nanoscale, while also enabling key nanotechnology innovations in the fields of energy, biotechnology, arts and medicine.

Open Government: New York’s Straight Talk From the Taxpayer is an interactive website where citizens can submit, vote and comment on ideas for state spending. The site has more than 4,000 users, who have submitted 1,100 ideas and 3,700 comments. Open Legislation is a website that makes legislative data available to the public for searching, commenting and sharing with others. And the New York State Senate’s NYSenate Mobile is thought to be the first mobile legislative application in the country where citizens can search for bill information, contact their senator, review event calendars, watch archived video of Senate sessions and hearings, and submit freedom of information requests. The state also is developing a Peer to Policy site, modeled on the federal government’s Peer-to-Patent program. The Peer to Policy project is a partnership between the state government, New York Law School and Pace University to develop a collaborative tool for technology policy development. The project will create a dedicated site for policymakers and citizens to develop statewide IT policies.

Finance and Administration: New York state government employees are associated with several different unions and bargaining units. As a result, ensuring compliance with established time and attendance rules that are outlined in collective-bargaining agreements is difficult and complex. To reduce this burden, the Leave and Accrual Tracking System (LATS) was created to automate the timecard system. LATS is a Web-based automated timecard system that allows employees at 53 state agencies to record their time worked and track their accruals online. Incorporating the New York State Civil Service Time and Attendance rules, LATS automatically calculates accrual credits based on anniversary dates and ensures proper charges for time off. LATS also allows for the automatic submission of electronic timecards to supervisors for approval.

NORTH CAROLINA

Grade: C+

NORTH DAKOTA

Grade: B

Best Practice

Public Safety: North Dakota recently implemented a Statewide Automated Victim Information Notification System that provides crime victims timely notification of criminal justice events relating to their case and the status of the offender throughout the criminal justice process. In the past, victim notification services weren’t provided in a consistent manner. Because of the rural nature of North Dakota, many local jurisdictions have small staffs and limited technology to provide this notification service. Only six of the 53 state’s attorneys had automated case-management systems, and only the largest of the 26 jails operated automated jail management systems, so it was difficult to get information about those incarcerated in or released from local jails. A Web-based, interactive voice response (IVR) notification system was implemented. The system provides victims with the option to receive notification via the Internet through a Web browser, e-mail and/or IVR telecommunication.

OHIO

Grade: B-

OKLAHOMA

Grade: C

OREGON

Grade: B+

Best Practice

Energy and Transportation: Closed-circuit TV used by Oregon Department of Transportation maintenance crews help to monitor weather and road conditions at remote locations, as well as quickly and efficiently detect, verify and plan responses for highway incidents. The images are also provided to the public through TripCheck to help drivers make more informed travel decisions. The department has deployed detectors to determine whether approaching vehicles are too long to safely maneuver a challenging roadway. If a vehicle is too long, signs flash to warn the driver. The Green Light program provides a way for truckers to save the time and money they waste stopping at Oregon weigh stations by using a free truck weigh station “preclearance” system. The nation’s first Solar Highway project started feeding clean, renewable energy into the electricity grid on Dec. 19, 2008. The 104-kilowatt ground-mounted solar array supplies about one-third of the energy needed for illumination at the site.

PENNSYLVANIA

Grade: A-

Best Practices

Enterprise IT: The majority of servers and applications in Pennsylvania executive branch agencies, boards and commissions have been consolidated into and are hosted by the Data PowerHouse and Enterprise Server Farm. The PowerHouse has 268 physical servers, 337 virtual servers, five IBM and Unisys mainframes, and 185 terabytes of configured storage. In the coming years, server virtualization is expected to save $45 million through reduced space and power needs. In July 2009, the Office of Administration’s Office for Information Technology launched COPANET, an eight-mile, highly redundant fiber-optic network connecting seven buildings in Harrisburg’s Capitol Complex. With a cost of $7.8 million to build and annual savings of approximately $2.1 million, the network will pay for itself in less than four years and provide tens of millions of dollars in future cost avoidance.

Health and Human Services: The departments of Public Welfare and Education launched the Pennsylvania Early Learning Network (ELN) in 2009 to longitudinally track a child’s educational progress from birth through secondary education. The network is designed to let the state measure the long-term effectiveness of early childhood education programs. The ELN collects data on children served by the Department of Public Welfare’s Office of Child Development and Early Learning, links that data to child assessments and developmental outcomes, as well as K-12 data through the use of unique identifiers. The Web-based network enables the collection of reported information such as quality indicators and demographics. The ELN automates data collection from previously manual programs, and it uses a service-oriented architecture to transparently collect data from existing automated systems and link unique identifiers across departments. All of this information is housed in a central repository of information about the children, their families, the providers supporting the services and early education staff. The central repository feeds a data warehouse solution that supports the ability to report, trend and analyze the data.

RHODE ISLAND

Grade: C+

SOUTH CAROLINA

Grade: C-

SOUTH DAKOTA

Grade: B+

Best Practice

Commerce, Labor and Tax: The Capitalizing on Efficiencies and Data Accelerating Revenue System (CEDAR), an integrated tax system, was implemented in January 2009. Based on a nine-month comparison of data from the previous systems to the new CEDAR system, there’s been a 21 percent increase in total audits completed, for an additional 298 audits. There also has been a 20 percent increase in total audit assessments for an increase of approximately $2.4 million and an increase in total audit collections of $57,000. The South Dakota Customized Automated Registration System was made available July 2008, and is utilized by all counties statewide in performing motor vehicle title and registration functions. Taxpayers can log on to the system’s website, enter their secure key information, select which of their vehicles to renew, and pay their registration renewal fees online.

TENNESSEE

Grade: B+

Best Practices

Public Safety: Using Tennessee’s Integrated Criminal Justice Web Portal, criminal justice and law enforcement users have access to a variety of systems to identify individuals, conduct criminal and pretrial investigations, perform background checks, determine current location of probationers and parolees, and obtain driver history and vehicle registration information. Prior to this initiative, obtaining information from these systems required phone calls, paper requests, e-mails and/or faxes, all of which generated operating costs for both the requesting and servicing agency. More than 150 agencies with approximately 3,000 users are actively utilizing the Web portal. Phase two of the Integrated Criminal Justice Portal will provide enhancements and increased access to more than 400 criminal justice agencies statewide.

Health and Human Services: In 2008, Gov. Phil Bredesen’s e-Health Council defined specific objectives to increase the number of physicians connected to secure, high-speed broadband and promote the use of electronic prescribing to improve patient safety. The state established a one-time, state-funded grant program to provide $2,500 or $3,500 per physician to purchase equipment, hardware, software or peripherals. The grant requires providers to e-prescribe for two years. So far, 397 treatment sites in 74 of Tennessee’s 95 counties have signed on to the state’s e-Health Network to participate in e-prescribing. The state has allocated funding to almost 1,700 physicians, and more than 1,200 others are in the process of enrolling in the grant program.

TEXAS

Grade: B

UTAH

Grade: A

Best Practices

Energy and Transportation: The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources implemented a hunting and fishing licensing service. All hunting and fishing license purchases are done online. In the past two years, eBay, Oracle and others have built major data centers in the state. The state worked with these companies to implement designs that reduce energy consumption. For example, eBay’s new Topaz data center in Utah is 50 percent cheaper to operate than its average data center due to a variety of energy-efficient measures. The state has also dramatically reduced the energy consumption in its data centers. To encourage prudent use of geothermal resources, Utah made its complete database of geothermal wells and springs available online. The state also has placed wind-measuring devices, called anemometers, at key sites across Utah and shared this wind data online so that entrepreneurs can identify opportunities to develop wind energy resources in the state.

Public Safety: From 2008 to 2010, Utah’s e-Warrants system was promoted and extended to all law enforcement agencies statewide. The e-Warrants system allows Utah law enforcement officers to enter search warrant affidavit information, and the system then electronically notifies a prosecutor and forwards the affidavit for review. After review, an officer can transfer the affidavit to a magistrate, electronically notifying him or her of the waiting request. The magistrate can then electronically review the affidavit and generated warrant, electronically sign the warrant, or deny the request with comments, then electronically send the results back to the officer. The warrant can then be printed and served. Using the e-Warrants system has greatly increased the productivity of law enforcement officers and judges when submitting an affidavit for a warrant. As of June, nearly all law enforcement agencies as well as all judicial districts in Utah were participating in e-Warrants.

Commerce, Labor and Tax: The new On The Spot vehicle registration, implemented in 2008 by the State Tax Commission, had more than 375,000 users in 2009. During the past two years, Utah has digitized more than 1 million cultural artifacts (i.e., images, documents, etc.) and partnered with the Mountain West Digital Library to create a new Digital Collections Portal. Eighty-nine percent of all annual business renewals are performed online. Seventy-one percent of real-estate licenses are renewed online. Ninety percent of professional license renewals are done online. Utah introduced its first iPhone app when it created a mobile version of its Licensee Lookup service. Citizens can use their smartphone to look up the license status of any of Utah’s more than 400 professional license holders, such as doctors, engineers, architects and contractors.

Health and Human Services: Utah’s Master Person Index (MPI) is a Recovery Act-funded resource that creates a unique identity for citizens as they travel through the various layers of the health-care system. Using the MPI, researchers can perform broad population-based studies of treatment quality, disease discovery and genetic population research. Another long-term goal is to use the MPI for a statewide health information exchange, so that a single resource can be used to benefit research and support statewide health treatment and payment. In 2008, the Utah Health Data Committee also approved the creation of a database of all health-care payers in the state, which would let Utah analyze episodes of care derived from health insurance claims. For example, in maternity care, the episode of care would begin with the mother’s first prenatal visit and include all other visits, pharmacy claims, lab tests, special procedures, delivery of the baby and postpartum care.

Finance and Administration: Utah updated its facilities management systems and is using Facilities Max as a shared service by providing it to state colleges and universities. Utah has developed an enterprise building controls and facilities automation portal that allows most building automation functions (i.e., HVAC, security, etc.) to be managed more efficiently. The AiM reporting provides active business intelligence that dramatically improves overall facilities management across the state. Some facilities report annual savings of as much as $133,000 for a single building.

VERMONT

Grade: C+

VIRGINIA

Grade: A-

Best Practices

Public Safety: The Virginia Corrections Information System (VirginiaCORIS) is a cross-boundary project led by the state corrections department that unites offender management for more than 4,000 users — prison institutions, probation and parole officers, and the Virginia Parole Board — to manage more than 100,000 offenders at 115 locations. Launched in modules from 2008 to 2010, the system now communicates with and is used by the Virginia State Police, attorney general and courts. More than a dozen legacy systems, including one 32-year-old mainframe system, have been retired. Multiple user groups now track offenders and log information (including a complete real-time log of all contacts with corrections and law enforcement systems) and update this integrated system from any location 24/7 via secure Web access. VirginiaCORIS has captured 1.8 million officer notes that previously were paper-based; more than 8,000 arrest notifications have been delivered into the system for officer notifications of offender activity. Prior to VirginiaCORIS, access to offender information was unavailable to users such as the State Police for 12 hours daily.

Open Government: Virginia’s statewide business intelligence initiative provides the foundation for several innovative citizen engagement websites. For instance, www.open.virginia.gov lets users view performance metrics for the state government, research state and local government expenditures and revenues, and compare budgets to actual spending. Virginia’s Commonwealth Data Point, produced by the independent auditor of public accounts, also provides information on state and local government expenditures and revenues. Furthermore, it lets users track government credit card transactions, population levels in prisons and schools, and government work force levels. Virginia’s budget site provides current budget information for the state by linking to the executive budget document and providing searches of the budget bill database.

WASHINGTON

Grade: B-

WEST VIRGINA

Grade: B

WISCONSIN

Grade: C+

WYOMING

Grade: C


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Comments

Pat Ferguson    |    Commented September 28, 2010

Is Alabama a C or a B? The map shows one thing and the listing below something else.

Matt Williams    |    Commented September 28, 2010

Alabama's grade is C. The text has been updated to reflect this. -- Matt Williams, associate editor of Government Technology

John H    |    Commented September 29, 2010

You forgot to factor in the Wisconsin tradition of self deprecation and modesty. Our grade should be at least a full level higher just based on that. We are probably the most humble people this side of Minnesota. :)

Nobody below a C    |    Commented September 30, 2010

Good to see that everybody passed! Hooray for grade inflation!

Connie F    |    Commented October 12, 2011

Where can we see the entire survey, that is, all the questions and state responses? Regards,

Richard M    |    Commented October 29, 2012

Connie, you can't. That's why we've given Government Technology an F- for transparency. All these rankings go on behind closed doors, mainly because making the process open so that people could see the actual methodology would expose how thin the actual data from the survey is and how much is based on on subjective responses from people who have a vested interest in promoting this rank to the citizens of their state as proof that they're actually doing something.


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