Faculty and 35 sixth-grade students at Cahaba Heights Community School in Alabama will receive laptops equipped with textbook-related software as part of a three-year pilot aimed at improving learning. If the pilot is successful, the Vestavia Hills Board of Education plans to expand the program to all district sixth-graders and sixth-grade faculty. -- The Birmingham News

Colorado's Snowmass ski area installed a micro-hydroelectric turbine to generate electricity from spring snowmelt. The power plant generates enough energy to power 40 homes. The Governor's Office of Energy Management & Conservation helped fund the project. -- Aspen Daily News

A $28,000 federal grant will bring Internet access to low-income, rural communities in Delaware's Kent and Sussex counties, local agricultural officials said. U.S. Department of Agriculture funds bought a new pickup that will carry a mobile computer lab to 12 communities, where Internet availability is spotty at best. -- USA Today

The Floyd County, Iowa, Sheriff's Office has a new tool to monitor anhydrous ammonia tanks to prevent theft by methamphetamine producers. The handheld thermal imaging device -- free through a technology transfer program sponsored by the Office of National Drug Control Policy -- senses heat and generates images in all lighting conditions. -- USA Today

Throughout Nebraska, 30 new touchscreen interactive kiosks are being placed at Interstate 80 rest stops and along scenic byways. Six of the 10 interstate kiosks, which feature weather and tourism information, are in place. -- USA Today

University of New Hampshire researchers joined an international team of scientists to perform atmospheric research involving airplanes, air balloons, satellites and a network of high-tech observing stations. The researchers collected chemical and meteorological information about the air as it crossed the United States, traversed the Atlantic Ocean and arrived in Western Europe.

The Allegheny County, Pa., District Attorney's Office plans to post arrests on its Web site, which will list each suspect's address and crime codes to explain each arrest. Information will stay online for three days. Officials regard the site as an online police blotter, which is considered public record. -- Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Scientists will install 20 earthquake sensors around Charleston, S.C., to collect seismic data. Each sensor is housed in a fiberglass tube with a car battery for backup power, an Internet connection and GPS antenna. Eventually 6,000 nationwide sensors will be part of the Advanced National Seismic System, improving building design and emergency response and providing seismic information on the Internet. -- Charleston Post and Courier

Miriam Jones  |  Chief Copy Editor