Alisoun Moore vacated the Maryland CIO position to take the same post in Montgomery County, Md. Moore served the state for 13 years, including the last 19 months as CIO.

You left a job with the state of Maryland to take a job with Montgomery County that is less demanding but pays more. How did that happen?

Youre going to have to ask the governor about that one. Thats a very good question and one every state should probably be asking because county and municipal governments in several cases pay their senior people more than the state.

What were you able to accomplish in 19 months as Maryland CIO?

We set a new direction for e-government within the state. I fully reorganized the Office of Information Technology. There was legislation that was passed last year with a lot of support called the Digital Dozen. Part of that was e-government legislation that requires 50 percent of our services to be online by 2002, 65 percent by 2003 and 80 percent by 2004.

We got a portal pilot done and I also got through IDIQ (indefinite delivery indefinite quantity)-like procurement worth a half billion dollars. We got a lot of initiatives started so I felt comfortable with that.

How will the job in Montgomery County differ?

It will be pretty much the same but smaller in scale. Montgomery County is a very progressive, affluent county, and theyve embraced e-government. They have an eMontgomery initiative. The County Council and the county executive seem to be extremely supportive on technology issues, so Ill continue some of the same initiatives I launched at the state of Maryland.

What do you think will be the biggest IT issues for Montgomery County?

There will be two. Number one, e-government, or the positioning of services to citizens electronically. I believe it will be a combination of the Internet and interactive voice response-converged technology.

The next issue is going to be doing all of that in what we see as a tightening economy. I believe revenues will become tighter and government is going to have to react to that as it always does. That will be a challenge for all of us.

Jim McKay, Justice and Public Safety Editor  |  Justice and Public Safety Editor