With this issue, Government Technology begins its 21st year of publishing - and we've recently done a substantial amount of thinking about what this publication should be as it enters its third decade.

Our conclusion? Above all else, Government Technology must be job critical to you: the men and women responsible for choosing, implementing and operating the technology that makes modern government work. In late 2007, through extensive surveys, we asked what types of information you needed to be more effective and successful. Hundreds of you responded, and the issue you're reading is the product of that interaction.

Our cover story examines rampant "consumerization" of location data and how that trend impacts government, a power user of traditional GIS applications. Among other things, the article shows how agencies are using new Web-based tools to extract more value from location data by putting that information in new forms and delivering it to new classes of users.

We also investigate how emerging WiMAX technology could help reinvigorate the moribund municipal wireless industry. Our new monthly Personal Computing column breaks down the difference between social networks, blogs and discussion groups. And the Work Force department looks at California's effort to match retired state workers with state agencies needing temporary help.

If you're reading a paper copy, you'll notice something else, too. We've redesigned the publication into a fresh, contemporary size that's easier to carry and pass along.

Throughout this year, we'll feature regular coverage of project funding techniques, as well as expanded "how-to" information on a range of practical topics. We're also planning expanded research-based features on information security, work force development and other key issues.

For 20 years, Government Technology has been an indispensable source of practical information for government. As we enter our third decade, we intend to continue bringing you objective, job-critical information designed to advance both your career and your agency's mission.

Steve Towns  |  Executive Editor