Political fallout from open source cost Massachusetts CIO Peter Quinn his job. Cities throughout the nation jumped on the muni wireless bandwagon. Issues such as Real ID and electronic medical records moved to the front burner for many IT officials. And that's merely the tip of the proverbial iceberg.

Welcome to our review of the events that shaped government IT in 2006.

As usual, state and local CIOs faced more than their share of challenges. IT consolidation continued throughout the nation, carrying with it all of the thorny cultural issues and upsets that accompany organizational change. Technology leaders also struggled to make vital information more open and mobile -- but at the same time more secure, an often conflicting mix of requirements, especially on tight public-sector budgets.

On the brighter side, CIOs and elected officials received solid evidence that IT investments are paying off. Our 2006 Digital States Survey, released in October, shows double-digit growth since 2004 in the number of citizens and businesses using the electronic channel to transact business with their state governments.

All that to say this: Using technology to reform government isn't easy. That much will be readily apparent on the following pages. But citizens and constituents certainly appreciate the results.

Read the complete review.

Shane Peterson  |  Associate Editor