This issue of Government Technology's Public CIO is not only the first of the New Year, but it also marks the beginning of a new era for the magazine. Public CIO started as a quarterly in 2003 with the objective of covering the public-sector IT community in an unprecedented manner. We decided to publish a peer publication with well-researched articles focusing on issues pertaining to leadership, management and technology.

We got subject matter experts to write for us, and asked some CIOs to try their hand. We profiled not just your colleagues, but also industry leaders and politicians who get technology. We also introduced a book review section -- something rarely found in trade magazines for government professionals. Above all, we tried to become a source of knowledge for technology chiefs throughout the public sector.

I'm happy to say that our editorial mission is working -- so much that we've decided to expand our frequency to six times annually. As a part of our editorial expansion, you'll receive two extra issues of thought leadership articles each year. We are also introducing several new sections to the magazine that will increase topical awareness, along with our in-depth stories and interviews. These additions include "Data Mining," which looks behind the numbers and data in published research reports and surveys that are relevant to public sector CIOs; "Tech Trends," which delivers a short but insightful analysis of new technologies that have yet to take hold in the public sector; and "CIO Sightings," which highlights recent activities among your colleagues in the public-sector IT community.

In alignment with our editorial mission, we opened an editorial bureau in Washington, D.C., so that we can better cover the largest single government IT market in the world. Now we can give you the inside story about the federal sector and its intergovernmental IT applications, solutions, trends and issues -- and the people behind them.

We're also implementing digital upgrades. The Public CIO Web site -- the online community for public-sector IT executives -- is adding more editorial content, including articles, guest analysis, commentaries and surveys, just to name a few of the exclusive features.

This is all part of our effort to give you the most complete coverage on one of the most complex, but important topics affecting the public sector today. We hope you like our expansion plans. Let us know what you think about them -- and the articles in this issue or topics you would like to see covered in future issues and online. Send me an e-mail at Tod Newcombe. I look forward to hearing from you.

Tod Newcombe  |  Senior Editor

With more than 20 years of experience covering state and local government, Tod previously was the editor of Public CIO, e.Republic’s award-winning publication for information technology executives in the public sector. He is now a senior editor for Government Technology and a columnist at Governing magazine.