Governance Gaps in New Hampshire IT

New Hampshire CIO Denis Goulet talks about how he's somewhat insulated from changes in elected leadership, and shares his No. 1 priority for advancing technology in the state.

by / May 4, 2017
Denis Goulet, CIO, New Hampshire David Kidd/e.Republic Inc.

In the state of New Hampshire, the chief information officer doesn't tend to turn over every time there's a new governor. In fact, as CIO Denis Goulet explained at last week's NASCIO Midyear conference in Arlington, Va., the fate of the state CIO bears little relationship to changes resulting from gubernatorial elections. New Hampshire, and neighboring Vermont, are unique in the fact that they vote for governor every two years, unlike the four-year schedule observed in all other states — which results in more stability in the CIO's office.

As for Goulet's priorities during his tenure leading state IT, governance tops the list. While the state's centralized model means it's in good shape where core infrastructure is concerned, the state's overall technology strategy needs some work, he says. Below, he outlines his approach.   

Noelle Knell Editor

Government Technology editor Noelle Knell has more than 15 years of writing and editing experience, covering public projects, transportation, business and technology. A California native, she has worked in both state and local government, and is a graduate of the University of California, Davis, with majors in political science and American history. She can be reached via email and on Twitter.