Managing Citizen Engagement Overload

When government gets too much of a good thing, can open-source technology help?

by , , / April 18, 2018

The government gets more feedback than it can handle.

In part, that's because public-sector leaders have asked for it. Public officials want increased citizen engagement.

But part of the overload comes from advocacy groups that have launched campaigns to swamp elected officials with calls and emails. Social media has also made it so much easier for amplifying voices vying for the attention of politicians and public officials.

Enter the OpenGov Foundation, a nonpolitical nonprofit that's working with Congress to explore open-source solutions for getting its arms around overwhelming constituent communication. The answers to date are incomplete and solutions inadequate, but the lessons from the research have implications for state and local legislators.

On this episode of "Go Public," Government Technology's Noelle Knell and Zack Quaintance take stock of public engagement today and the prospects for creating satisfying experiences between citizens and their government.

Listen below and subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher . 

 

 

On this episode:

 

Zack Quaintance Staff Writer

Zack Quaintance is a staff writer for Government Technology. Prior to that, he spent five years working in daily newspapers, and another five years working in the tech sector. He lives in Northern California.

Noelle Knell Editor

Government Technology editor Noelle Knell has more than 15 years of writing and editing experience, covering public projects, transportation, business and technology. A California native, she has worked in both state and local government, and is a graduate of the University of California, Davis, with majors in political science and American history. She can be reached via email and on Twitter.

Paul W. Taylor Editor-at-Large

Paul W. Taylor, Ph.D., is the editor-at-large of Governing magazine. He also serves as the chief content officer of e.Republic, Governing’s parent organization, as well as senior advisor to the Governing Institute. Prior to joining e.Republic, Taylor served as deputy Washington state CIO and chief of staff of the state Information Services Board (ISB). Dr. Taylor came to public service following decades of work in media, Internet start-ups and academia. He is also among a number of affiliated experts with the non-profit, non-partisan Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) in Washington, D.C.