Governments Don't Always Pay Hackers, But What If They Did?

Going against the FBI's ransomware advice is one way state chief information officers are thinking for themselves.

A new generation of state technology leaders is rethinking the conventional wisdom (and FBI's advice) about cybersecurity.

When a government agency's computers and files are locked by hackers, the FBI advises against giving in to their monetary demands. That's fine as long as backup files are still available, but ransomware attacks are evolving to go after those, too.

At the same time, many state CIOs are taking a wait-and-see approach to widescale adoption of emerging technologies like artificial intelligence.

On this episode of "Go Public," Government Technology’s Noelle Knell and Lauren Harrison discuss these new challenges and opportunities with the backdrop of midterm elections that have already prompted the departure of some state CIOs.

Listen below and subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher.

 

 

On this episode:

Lauren Harrison Managing Editor

Lauren Harrison is the managing editor for Government Technology magazine. She has a degree in English from the University of California, Berkeley, and more than 10 years’ experience in book and magazine publishing.

Noelle Knell Editor

Government Technology editor Noelle Knell has more than 15 years of writing and editing experience, covering public projects, transportation, business and technology. A California native, she has worked in both state and local government, and is a graduate of the University of California, Davis, with majors in political science and American history. She can be reached via email and on Twitter.

Paul W. Taylor Editor-at-Large

Paul W. Taylor, Ph.D., is the editor-at-large of Governing magazine. He also serves as the chief content officer of e.Republic, Governing’s parent organization, as well as senior advisor to the Governing Institute. Prior to joining e.Republic, Taylor served as deputy Washington state CIO and chief of staff of the state Information Services Board (ISB). Dr. Taylor came to public service following decades of work in media, Internet start-ups and academia. He is also among a number of affiliated experts with the non-profit, non-partisan Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) in Washington, D.C.