Wearable Tech to Offer Better Nuclear and Radiological Detection

A recently awarded Department of Homeland Security contract for wearable, passive detection technology could soon result in better protection against nuclear and radiological threats at sea and land ports across the country.

by / November 10, 2015
Tosca and her Maritime Security Response Team (MSRT) canine officer sweep the deck of Mississippi Canyon Block 582, Medusa Platform during a joint exercise May 21, 2014. The MSRT, Murphy Oil Corp., and Department of Defense worked together to train to respond to threats aboard the production facility. Flickr/U.S. Coast Gaurd

Federal “frontline personnel” could soon see the benefits of a multimillion dollar contract for the development of compact nuclear and radiological threat detection equipment.

In a Nov. 5 blog published by the Department of Homeland Security Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO), Director Huban Gowadia said the new equipment, known as the Human Portable Tripwire, would soon become a critical tool for personnel operating in the maritime environment, at land and sea ports of entry, and within the United States.

The wearable, passive technology would help federal personnel with the U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and Transportation Security Administration to identify nuclear and radioactive materials and threats.

 

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