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What technology will allow Internet communications in space?

Answer: lasers

by News Staff / July 24, 2013

Due to launch on July 25, the European Space Agency's Alphasat satellite will carry an experimental device used to accept a 300 Mbps datastream from Germany's Tandem-X satellite and transmit the signal to Earth. The laser communications system uses a 30 cm telescope to direct what NASA hopes will be a 622 Mbps communications stream from lunar orbit to Earth.