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What space-age device could someday replace your local grocery store?

Answer: food printers

by News Staff / August 7, 2013

The food printer, dubbed “Cornucopia” by the two MIT graduate students who introduced their concept, stores and refrigerates ingredients in cartridges. The ingredients are fed into a mixing chamber, where they can be combined to produce varying flavors, and extruded to print an edible 3-D structure.