California Performance Review Issues Report

'California's technology programs have been diminished by the current budget deficit, restricted by stovepiping and burdened by archaic, bureaucratic processes. All this is occurring while the state stares at ... loss of a skilled technology workforce, with no plan in place to mitigate the resulting risks.'

by / August 3, 2004
California today released the four-volume California Performance Review Report Government for the People for a Change containing "... over 1,200 recommendations that have the potential to save the state $32 billion over the next five years and guide California's government into the 21st century."

"California's vital technology programs are in crisis," begins the Technology Alignment section. "They are distributed across hundreds of agencies with no statewide strategic direction or alignment with overarching statewide goals. There is no overall coordination of the state's use of technology, resulting in functions that are poorly organized, duplicative and inefficient from a statewide perspective. California's technology programs have been diminished by the current budget deficit, restricted by stovepiping and burdened by archaic, bureaucratic processes. All this is occurring while the state stares at an inevitable and momentous loss of a skilled technology workforce, with no plan in place to mitigate the resulting risks."

The report goes on to recommend the consolidation of California's two general-purpose data centers -- Stephen P. Teale and Health and Human Services.

Among other recommendations are the establishment of a new technology division to serve executive branch agencies and the appointment of a state chief technology officer with operational oversight responsibility for the new organization.

The CPR -- created last Feb 10 by Governor Schwarzenegger -- examined organizational structures, analyzed data, met with stakeholders and compiled recommendations.

"We cannot afford waste and fraud in any department or agency," said Schwarzenegger at the CPR launch. "This unprecedented action will mean a total review of government; its performance, its practices, and its costs. Together with my dedicated team of experts, we will make California the first true 21st century government in America, a government that is as innovative and dynamic as the state itself."

The release was delayed until the state's budget was finalized, which occurred July 27th.
Wayne Hanson

Wayne E. Hanson served as a writer and editor with e.Republic from 1989 to 2013, having worked for several business units including Government Technology magazine, the Center for Digital Government, Governing, and Digital Communities. Hanson was a juror from 1999 to 2004 with the Stockholm Challenge and Global Junior Challenge competitions in information technology and education.