Will States Adopt Federal IT Management Changes?

The US Office of Management & Budget (OMB) will be implementing fundamental changes that “entail structural changes in how programs are funded, staffed and managed.” The plans call for a “cloud-first” policy which boosts the use of government cloud computing for new systems.

by / November 21, 2010 0

According to Federal Computer Week (FCW), the Obama administration has developed a five-pronged strategy for improving IT management in the federal government. The US Office of Management & Budget (OMB) will be implementing fundamental changes that “entail structural changes in how programs are funded, staffed and managed.”

The plans call for a “cloud-first” policy which boosts the use of government cloud computing for new systems.

The five areas which will see dramatic changes include:

1.      Align budgets and acquisitions with the technology cycle.

2.      Strengthen program management

3.    Increase accountability and streamline government.

4.    Increase engagement with industry

5.    Adopt light technologies and shared solutions.

These areas are described in more detail in the Federal Computer Week article, and CIO Vivek Kundra will hold a public event Dec. 9 to offer additional details on action items.

Looking through the list, these same actions are bound to become priorities within state governments, in my view. The main reason is that cost-cutting will be even more important in the coming year, as well as showing a return on technology investments. In addition, state governments must follow their federal partners in many cases in order to obtain funding for projects. (In Michigan, approximately 60% of IT dollars spent come from the federal government.)

Therefore, state governments are usually affected by federal trends, either directly or indirectly. Bottom line, expect these same five areas to show up in a state or local government near you. Similar trends can be seen in the National Association of State CIOs (NASCIO) priority list for the coming year.    

What are your thoughts on upcoming management changes in technology for 2011?

 

Dan Lohrmann Chief Security Officer & Chief Strategist at Security Mentor Inc.

DAN LOHRMANN

Daniel J. Lohrmann is an internationally recognized cybersecurity leader, technologist, keynote speaker and author.

During his distinguished career, he has served global organizations in the public and private sectors in a variety of executive leadership capacities, receiving numerous national awards including: CSO of the Year, Public Official of the Year and Computerworld Premier 100 IT Leader.
Lohrmann led Michigan government’s cybersecurity and technology infrastructure teams from May 2002 to August 2014, including enterprisewide Chief Security Officer (CSO), Chief Technology Officer (CTO) and Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) roles in Michigan.

He currently serves as the Chief Security Officer (CSO) and Chief Strategist for Security Mentor Inc. He is leading the development and implementation of Security Mentor’s industry-leading cyber training, consulting and workshops for end users, managers and executives in the public and private sectors. He has advised senior leaders at the White House, National Governors Association (NGA), National Association of State CIOs (NASCIO), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), federal, state and local government agencies, Fortune 500 companies, small businesses and nonprofit institutions.

He has more than 30 years of experience in the computer industry, beginning his career with the National Security Agency. He worked for three years in England as a senior network engineer for Lockheed Martin (formerly Loral Aerospace) and for four years as a technical director for ManTech International in a US/UK military facility.

Lohrmann is the author of two books: Virtual Integrity: Faithfully Navigating the Brave New Web and BYOD for You: The Guide to Bring Your Own Device to Work. He has been a keynote speaker at global security and technology conferences from South Africa to Dubai and from Washington, D.C., to Moscow.

He holds a master's degree in computer science (CS) from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and a bachelor's degree in CS from Valparaiso University in Indiana.

Follow Lohrmann on Twitter at: @govcso