October 31, 2012    /    by

Tropical Storm Sandy Slams Networks

The impact of Tropical Storm Sandy is being felt far and wide.

 

The impact of Tropical Storm Sandy is being felt far and wide.

Here are just four of the hundreds of articles describing the widespread damage and storm impact:

Sandy slams mobile, wired and cable networks as far west as Michigan

"Post-Tropical Cyclone Sandy knocked out mobile, phone and cable service in many parts of the eastern U.S. on Monday, with about one in four cell sites affected in the hardest-hit band of the country between Virginia and Massachusetts, according to an FCC estimate.

About 25 percent of the cell sites in the 10-state area were out of service at 10 a.m. Eastern on Tuesday, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission estimated. Due to the floods, high winds and snow brought by the storm, there were reports of outages as far west as Michigan, the agency said. The situation could become worse in some areas as backup power supplies for affected cell sites run out, it warned."

Sandy's impact: State by state

“A running CNN tally reflects a steady restoration of power to affected areas, but early Wednesday, nearly 6.2 million customers were still without power in 15 states and Washington.

 

Here's a look at how Sandy has affected the United States and Canada….”

Storm forces Internet hubs to run on generator power

"Two monolithic buildings in lower Manhattan that serve as major network hubs for the U.S. are operating on generator power, thanks to Hurricane Sandy.

The buildings, known as carrier hotels, are a 2.9 million square foot structure at 111 8th Ave., and a 1.8 million square foot facility at 60 Hudson St."

Sandy's damage done

“Power could be out for a week — a fact noted by some New Yorkers who packed their bags and headed for the exits.

The storm was blamed for 51 deaths up and down the East Coast, according to the Associated Press. The tempest played havoc with the power grid, knocking out electricity to 7.5 million people. More than 16,000 airline flights have been canceled so far. Eqecat, a firm that models the costs of catastrophes for insurance companies, estimated Sandy’s economic impact on the country at $10 billion to $20 billion.”

I found the coverage of Sandy to be very interesting across the major networks this morning. Obviously, the devastation is huge – especially in New York and in New Jersey. Several news outlets were also warning people in other parts of the country about Sandy related scams.

Our thoughts and prayers go out to those affected by the storm.