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San Francisco Public Library to Increase Broadband Speed to 10 Gbps

According to stakeholders, the library accesses city-owned fiber for the connections, which is a 10 gigabit connection to its main library and 1 gigabit at seven branch libraries.

by News Staff / June 30, 2015
Participants claim the San Francisco Public Library (pictured) is now the first 10 gigabit library in the U.S. FlickrCC

The San Francisco Public Library, the Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California (CENIC), and the city and county of San Francisco announced Friday that they have collaborated to provide direct connection at 10 gigabits per second at the main San Francisco Public Library to CENIC’s California Research and Education Network (CalREN).

According to the stakeholders, the San Francisco Public Library accesses city-owned fiber for the connections, which is a 10 gigabit connection to its main library at 100 Larkin Street and 1 gigabit at seven branch libraries, with plans to connect all 27 branch libraries at this speed using city-owned fiber.

The participants claim the San Francisco Public Library is now the first 10 gigabit library in the U.S.

“They are breaking new ground here, and it’s great to see,” said John Beto, director of University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center.

From CalREN, San Francisco’s libraries are connected to California’s K-12 and higher education systems, to research and education networks throughout the world, and to the public Internet.

“San Francisco was among the pilot sites that preceded the governor and Legislature’s ‘Lighting Up Libraries Initiative,’ which will bring additional broadband capacity to all of California’s public libraries; 389 libraries will connect starting in July of 2015, with a goal to connect all of California’s 1,112 public libraries in the next few years,” said CENIC President and CEO Louis Fox.

This staff report was originally published by TechWire