The battle to keep government information secure and accessible has moved from the periphery to the center. The stakes are high as more public data moves online, the Internet becomes the most critical piece of infrastructure, and as hackers, thieves and terrorists become more adept at attacking, breaching and disrupting government assets.

The job of chief information security officer (CISO) in any government organization is not for the faint of heart. Many who take up the profession are serious and highly specialized in security matters. That's what makes Dan Lohrmann, who until recently was Michigan's CISO, so special. He is a Renaissance man who can discuss the arcane details of IT security and then delve into the broader, societal issues of personal integrity and responsibility while using the Web.

Whether he is lecturing about security at a university, speaking before an audience or writing about the deeper implications of e-government and security in major publications, Lohrmann grabs and keeps his audience's attention. More importantly, he is a proven leader who delivers results in the public sector, making sure security is at the forefront of every IT project in Michigan.

Lohrmann is now the state's acting chief technology officer and director of the Infrastructure Services Administration. His leadership through talk and action has garnered attention and honors. He was named one of Governing magazine's Public Officials of the Year, and CSO of the Year for North America by SC Magazine in 2008. As IT becomes more integral to the business of government, the need for people who can think clearly about the balance between security and access will only grow. Dan Lohrmann has set the mold for how it can be done.