The Internet was abuzz Wednesday with the beta release of Google's first browser called Chrome. Chrome features a slick, minimalist interface that incorporates a number of handy features like tabbed browsing, application shortcuts, crash control and incognito mode. Application shortcuts, for example, allow users to open Web applications without being required to open Chrome itself. With crash control, should one Web page crash, only that tab will close instead of the entire browser. Incognito mode, referred to as "porn mode" by Internet pundits, lets Chrome users surf the Web without leaving any indications of their online whereabouts on their machines.

But the company with the motto "Do No Evil" came under fire for alarming language found in Chrome's End-User License Agreement (EULA). In particular, Section 11 of the EULA appears to give Google an unsettling amount of control over any content a user generates while using Chrome.

By late afternoon, however, public outcry apparently forced Google's hand. The original EULA was significantly changed. Presented here are the original offending agreements and the newly modified version.

Original:

11. Content license from you

11.1 You retain copyright and any other rights you already hold in Content which you submit, post or display on or through, the Services. By submitting, posting or displaying the content you give Google a perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide, royalty-free, and non-exclusive license to reproduce, adapt, modify, translate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute any Content which you submit, post or display on or through, the Services. This license is for the sole purpose of enabling Google to display, distribute and promote the Services and may be revoked for certain Services as defined in the Additional Terms of those Services.

11.2 You agree that this license includes a right for Google to make such Content available to other companies, organizations or individuals with whom Google has relationships for the provision of syndicated services, and to use such Content in connection with the provision of those services.

11.3 You understand that Google, in performing the required technical steps to provide the Services to our users, may (a) transmit or distribute your Content over various public networks and in various media; and (b) make such changes to your Content as are necessary to conform and adapt that Content to the technical requirements of connecting networks, devices, services or media. You agree that this license shall permit Google to take these actions.

11.4 You confirm and warrant to Google that you have all the rights, power and authority necessary to grant the above license.

 

Updated:

11. Content license from you

11.1 You retain copyright and any other rights you already hold in Content which you submit, post or display on or through, the Services.

 

Chad Vander Veen  |  Associate Editor