Podcast: Doing Social Media on a Shoestring, During Times of Social Change

The GovTech Social podcast welcomes the co-author of the original field guide for social media in government to provide practical advice on getting buy-in, getting started, and the tricky business of moderating social media comments.

by , / July 15, 2015
After a $128,000 heist of packaged nuts, Michigan's Shelby Township Police Department asked for the public’s help on social media. Shelby Township Police Department

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SHOW NOTES

Wake County CIO Bill Greeves (@bgreeves), who also is co-author of the original social media field guide for government, joined GovTech Social regulars Anil Chawla, Dustin Haisler and Paul Taylor for a wide-ranging discussion of doing social media on a shoestring budget, a template for moderating social media comments, and being nimble and responsive during times of significant social change. The crew manages to make connections among Pluto, stolen peanuts, and strategies and tactics for government social media. 

Stories mentioned in This Week in Tweet:

WHO NEEDS A PARADE?

Announcing your bid for the White House in 140 characters is now as common as bunting and whistle stops back in the day. Hillary Clinton did it.  So did Scott Walker … among others.

THE REDDIT REVOLT 

The Reddit community declared its independence by shutting down large chunks of forum in protest. Tired of shabby treatment by successive waves of executives, the sudden departure of beloved Reddit employee Victoria Taylor prompted an open revolt. The interim CEO is out, co-founder Steve Huffman is back to try to put things back together and restore trust. The full story here.

THE TWEETING POTHOLE: SEE, TWEET, PESTER

Created by an advertising agency for a Panamanian TV news program, this Twitter account sends out snarky, pleading tweets directly to Panama’s Ministry of Public Works, asking for the potholes to be fixed. The full story here.

MAKING THE RAINBOW CONNECTION

Twenty-six million Facebook users added a rainbow hue to their profile pictures to mark the SCOTUS decision on same sex marriage. Some government social media managers adopted the rainbow color scheme for official accounts too. The Washington Post wrote that the symbolism mattered because, “our social attitudes are informed largely by what we believe is standard or acceptable in our social group as a whole.” The full story here.

THE SOCIAL “SNIFFLE” WATCH

First came Google’s FluTrends, now the HealthDay app tallies social mention of sickness all around you. The full story here.

DESIGN MATTERS

Facebook gave its logo design a barely noticeable nip and tuck – bringing with it a subtle reminder to keep your social presence fresh. The full story here

A STORY THAT IS JUST NUTS (AND GENIUS)

The Shelby, Mich., Township Police Department recently uploaded a mugshot of a squirrel to its Facebook page to bring attention to a bizarre case in which someone stole $128,000 worth of packaged nuts. Later, the PD had to clarify that it was looking for a human suspect and asked residents to stop reporting on suspicious squirrel activity. The full story here.

THE ORIGINAL SOCIAL MEDIA FIELD GUIDE

Looking for the original Social Media in the Public Sector Field Guide, written by Bill Greeves and Ines Mergel? You can find it here.

A NEW SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT MODERATION GUIDE

Based on the easy-to-adopt moderation framework created by Wake County, NC., this content moderation guide provides three tactics to effectively moderate content for public agencies. Download here [Sponsored].

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Paul W. Taylor Chief Content Officer, e.Republic Inc.

Paul W. Taylor, Ph.D., is the editor-at-large of Governing magazine. He also serves as the chief content officer of e.Republic, Governing’s parent organization, as well as senior advisor to the Governing Institute. Prior to joining e.Republic, Taylor served as deputy Washington state CIO and chief of staff of the state Information Services Board (ISB). Dr. Taylor came to public service following decades of work in media, Internet start-ups and academia. He is also among a number of affiliated experts with the non-profit, non-partisan Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) in Washington, D.C.

Dustin Haisler Chief Innovation Officer, e.Republic Inc.

Dustin Haisler is the Chief Innovation Officer of Government Technology's parent company e.Republic. Previously the finance director and later CIO for Manor, Texas, a small city outside Austin, Haisler quickly built a track record and reputation as an early innovator in civic tech. As Chief Innovation Officer, Haisler has a strategic role to help shape the company’s products, services and future direction. Primarily, he leads e.Republic Labs, a market connector created as an ecosystem to educate, accelerate and ultimately scale technology innovation within the public sector. Read his full bio.