It’s easy to think of technology as a solution for every challenge. What’s uncommon, and more elusive, is to comprehend the forces behind tech innovation: our shared human needs and the people who answer them.

Bruce High practices this collaborative way of thinking in his role as CIO of Harris County, Texas. High has implemented many trendsetting tech initiatives based on collaboration, including the 2010 launch of a wireless LTE network exclusively for emergency personnel. The county network is one of the first in the U.S. approved by the FCC, and one that works alongside FirstNet, a coordinating group that aims to roll out a nationwide emergency network.

The county network — which required federal, state and local consensus — now has 88,000 devices connected to it and sits upon a foundation of more than 200 interlocal agreements. High said the accomplishment should be viewed in terms of people, not technology.

“It’s about finding core things people want to do and asking how we can get it done together,” he said.

High’s people-centered approach has staff reaching across departments to understand processes, with tech solutions filling the gaps.

“We all have the same needs, so we should be working together to get it done,” he said.

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Government Technology Staff Writer Jason Shueh Jason Shueh  |  Staff Writer

Jason Shueh is a staff writer for Government Technology magazine. His articles and writing have covered numerous subjects, from minute happenings to massive trends. A San Francisco Bay Area native, Shueh grew up in the east bay and Napa Valley, where his family is based. His writing has been published previously in the Tahoe Daily Tribune, Amazon Publishing, Bike Magazine, Diablo Magazine, The Sierra Sun, Nevada Appeal, The Union and the North Lake Tahoe Bonanza.