Since Code for America (CfA) launched in 2010, the project, which seeks to help “governments work better for everyone with the people and the power of the Web,” has become a sensation in city government.

In 2011, CfA’s 19 fellows worked for 11 months in Boston; Seattle; Washington, D.C.; and Philadelphia. These developers, designers, analysts and researchers  were embedded with host cities to help them undertake innovative projects they couldn’t do on their own. The fellows were so successful in fostering innovation that there are now eight participating cities.

“The 2011 fellows believe in the promise that government is, at its heart, what we do together that we can’t do individually,” said CfA founder Jennifer Pahlka. “We live in an era where new tools and approaches make it possible to make this promise real, and these talented, passionate and courageous individuals brought their technical and creative skills to this important work.”

Collectively the fellows wrote 21 applications, opened 72 data sets and attended 81 civic hackathons, Pahlka said.

“Most importantly, they partnered with countless change agents in government to try new approaches to connecting cities and their citizens,” she added. “Along with the amazing, talented public servants who partnered with them, they’re true heroes of a new movement.”

Chad Vander Veen  |  Associate Editor