Miriam Jones

Chief Copy Editor

Miriam Jones is chief copy editor of Government Technology, Governing, Public CIO and Emergency Management magazines. She joined e.Republic in 2000 as an editor of Converge magazine.

Plus, NETGEAR cloud-managed multi-gig WAX610 access points provide secure access for multiple devices simultaneously, and the Logitech Swytch simplifies videoconferencing from any laptop without adaptors.
Plus, Dell’s 75 4K Interactive Touch Monitor features 20-point multi-touch screen that works with fingers and styluses, and InFocus Corp. re-introduces its ScreenPlay projector line with two models.
Plus, the HP Jet Fusion 300/500 3-D printers produce functional full-color parts, and Lenovo's ThinkPad X1 Carbon has up to 15 hours battery life.
The storm, which some forecasters are calling a "bomb cyclone" or "snow hurricane," is bringing snow along with damaging winds, bone-chilling temps and the chance of coastal flooding
Plus Getac’s second-generation S410 semi-rugged notebook survives drops of up to 3 feet and SMK-Link Electronics ergonomic USB keyboard encourages natural arm, wrist and hand positions.
Buying with public money is difficult by design, but are there fair ways to fix it?
Plus, Toshiba's e-STUDIO4508LP hybrid copier is able to print erasable as well as standard documents, and Acer’s Predator Triton 700 ultrathin notebook is prime for gamers.
Plus, Apple's iPad Pro tablet contains a 12-megapixel camera and the Polycom Pano connects via Wi-Fi with nearly any device for easy content sharing.
Plus, the Reveal RS2-X2L body camera allows for 34 hours of audio and video to be recorded.
Neely says the state is looking to offload some more expensive workloads, pushing those into cheaper storage in the cloud, and battle recidivism using data analytics.
In the fourth quarter of 2015, San Francisco announced the biggest Internet of Things project in the U.S. to date, the most digital cities in the nation were named and the FAA announced that it will require drone owners to register devices with aviation authorities.
From smart city investments and use of Bitcoin technology in government to the Ashley Madison and U.S. Office of Personnel Management hacks, news during the third quarter of 2015 didn't disappoint.
In the second quarter of 2015, a few states created digital registries to track medical and recreational marijuana distribution centers, Facebook unveiled verified pages for government and transportation officials in Missouri unveil plans to launch America’s first smart highway.
From the launch of Google’s Government Innovation Lab and the January preview of Microsoft’s Windows 10 to use of predictive analytics in Chicago and Indiana, the first quarter of 2015 was chock full of newsworthy happenings in the world of government IT.
Toshiba's got a detachable PC that doubles as a tablet. Plus, check out the LG curved smartphone and ASUS ultraportable laptop.
Plus, Portland lights a Google Fiber franchise agreement, and seven universities explore using big data to provide personalized education.
Also, Appallicious releases its disaster assessment dashboard, and lawmakers is New York and California experiment with crowdsourced legislation.
Plus, IT consolidation in Minnesota saves the state close to $30 million in two years, and incoming Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella announces plans to cut 18,000 jobs.
Also, Michigan, Utah and Missouri top the Digital States Survey, and research points to growing popularity of crowdfunding to pay for civic projects.
Plus, Hawaii, the District of Columbia and Oakland County, Mich., best their peers in this year's Best of the Web awards, and the New Orleans iTeam analyzes crime stats to identify high-risk individuals and criminal social networks.
Adopting standard language helps move cybersecurity progress along.
Plus, wireless carriers face end-of-year FCC deadline, Los Angeles launches a $1 million innovation fund and a revamped app in Fairfax County, Va., gives citizens access to crime data.
New products for Android-lovers take wearables to the next level.
Plus Acer's new Chromebook 13 and Herman Miller's elegant Mirra 2 chair.
Public officials who’ve been at the center of response and recovery efforts reminisce on what went wrong and right, what works and what doesn’t, and how their experiences might be useful for others.
Also, the Logicube ZX-Tower can wipe eight drives simultaneously and the Soofa is a free outdoor charging station that offers location-based information.
Plus, a new kind of fruit tree is popping up in Europe -- green- and red-colored solar charging stations.
More governments are doing big data analytics, high-performance computing, collaborative applications and disaster recovery in the cloud.
How planners in Oregon and Kentucky use smartphones to collect valuable information.
The California Department of Justice’s mobile application platform sends vital information to officers’ smartphones.