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Skip-Descant

Skip Descant

Staff Writer

Skip Descant writes about smart cities, the Internet of Things, transportation and other areas. He spent more than 12 years reporting for daily newspapers in Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana and California. He lives in downtown Sacramento.

The smartphone-based congestion-pricing technology being tested in Bogota, Colombia, is showing promise. Some major U.S. cities are also looking at solutions to better manage their own crowded roadways.
From electrified pavement that can charge vehicles and delivery robots that collect data to flying taxis, transportation experts sound off on what we can expect highways and byways to look like in 2050.
Elected and other officials gathered in Birmingham, Ala., to announce a new U.S. Department of Transportation pilot program aimed at addressing past infrastructure projects that have harmed and divided communities.
Highly detailed data around cycling and pedestrian activity has not always been easy to come by. Public officials and micromobility advocates stress the need for better data to make the case for more and better infrastructure.
A recent study by Carnegie Mellon University looked at the effects of traffic, weather and other factors impacting the safety of highway work zones and increased accident risks in these areas.
PredictEV, an electric vehicle infrastructure planning software, is helping utilities and other organizations plan the location of EV charging both now and in the future.
Newly released data related to when cars with autonomous technology and advanced driver assistance systems are in car crashes has elected officials calling for more oversight to ensure improved highway safety.
Planning and paying for trips across multiple transportation modes in San Antonio, Texas, can now be accomplished in a single app, enabling a long-sought customer convenience.
As the U.S. begins the process of building out a national network of electric vehicle chargers, federal transportation and energy officials stress they must be accessible, user-friendly and interoperable.
The California Air Resources Board held the first of two hearings to consider a new requirement to transition the state to 100 percent electric vehicle sales by 2035. The board is expected to finalize the rule this year.