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Why Your Cybersecurity Posture Should be a Zero

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Cyber threats across commercial and government enterprises appear to be so common that seldom do we see major stories on the topic. The past couple of weeks were an exception, as gas stations along the East Coast ran out of fuel supplies, thanks to the paralyzing cyberattack on Colonial Pipeline.

Cyber threats across commercial and government enterprises appear to be so common that seldom do we see major stories on the topic. The past couple of weeks were an exception, as gas stations along the East Coast ran out of fuel supplies, thanks to the paralyzing cyberattack on Colonial Pipeline. In April, the Washington, D.C. police department suffered a ransomware attack, one of many that make state and local governments an attractive target for cyber crime.

Often, it’s not just ransom money that is the issue, but rather the disruption itself that is causing major safety concerns, according to a report from the Institute for Security and Technology.

For state and local governments trying to avoid these cataclysmic attacks, the best way to think about their security posture is to, well, start at ground zero, with a zero-trust approach.

Don’t trust, but verify

A standard network security posture is focused on stopping threats that come from outside the network perimeter, but can leave data vulnerable to theft inside the network. This approach utilizes firewalls, VPNs, access controls, IDS, IPS, SIEMs, and email gateways with security on the perimeter that cyber criminals now know how to breach. This means someone with the correct credentials could be admitted to any network’s sites, apps, or devices. With zero-trust security, no one is trusted by default from inside or outside the network. Zero trust operates from the start by requiring verification from every user trying to gain access to resources, thereby authenticating users and regulating access to systems, networks, and data. This process involves validating user identities, associated access rights to a particular system, and enables organizations to manage the digital identities of users ensuring the appropriate access. To strengthen authentication, zero trust also uses several layers of advanced access control for access to network devices and the servers that support resources. This approach also enables the ability to track user activities, create reports on those activities, and enforce policies to ensure compliance.

What is a Zero-Trust approach?

Reduce risk Reduce risks from constant threats with security-first design principles. Use technologies such as built-in tenant isolation and least privilege access also helping with compliance and privacy regulations. With well-managed identities, organizations enable greater control over user access, which translates to reduced risks of internal and external breaches.

Control access A zero-trust security approach involves capturing user information, managing user identities, and orchestrating access privileges to help with regulating access to systems or networks for individual users within an organization. Without the right identity and access management solution, your agency could be vulnerable through misuse of access/permission controls, unsanctioned cloud services allowing for data loss, data exposure from remote users and personal devices and even malicious insider activities, including former employees with active accounts and permissions.

Who your cloud provider is matters. You might want to ask yourself if your cloud provider can deliver an effective zero-trust security model that features:

  1. Security-first design principles with built-in security to reduce risk.

  • Isolated network virtualization
  • Granular separation of duties
  • Least privilege access

  1. Automated security to reduce complexity and prevent human error.

  • Automated threat mitigation and remediation

  1. Continuous, always-on security for seamless protection.
  • Default-enabled, ubiquitous encryption
  • Continuous monitoring of user behaviors
  • Context aware adaptive authentication

These are the features and attributes that are standard with Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, where security is integrated throughout every level. Our security-first approach is focused on reducing risk, automating security to reduce complexity and prevent human error and employing always-on encryption and continuous monitoring of user behavior. Get the details here., so that you too can earn a big zero on your security posture.

Become a master of your cybersecurity posture by attending the Oracle Masterclass series.
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