On Thursday, Jan. 10, Government Technology hosted its first TweetChat: Innovation in Focus – States and Health Insurance Exchanges.

The chat, held on Twitter using the hashtag #GTonHIX, included industry experts John Sweeney, IBM’s senior product manager for the Curam solution, and Dan Schuyler, director for Leavitt Partners’ health insurance exchange practice, to answer questions about state health insurance exchanges (HIX).

An HIX is a government-regulated, standardized marketplace for the purchase of health insurance, and the Obama administration mandates that each state have one. States may choose to create and run their own HIX, or they can opt out and have the federal government create their exchange for them.

States had to declare whether they were running their own exchange by Dec. 14, 2012. And according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, as of Jan. 4, 2013, 19 states, including the District of Columbia, submitted blueprints for HIXs to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which must approve the plans. Under the mandate, all insurance exchanges must be fully operational by Jan. 1, 2014.

As the deadline looms, states may have pressing questions about what needs to happen by 2014. Here are some of the discussion highlights:

1.    What are the benefits for both states and their citizens in building these exchanges?

2.    Are there any lessons learned from states that have implemented or are in the process of implementing an exchange?

3.    What are the technical challenges the states face in implementing HIXs?

4.    How different will the HIXs be across states?

5.    How can states maximize the cost benefits of implementing these HIXs?

Photo from Shutterstock 

Sarah Rich, Staff Writer Sarah Rich  |  Staff Writer

In 2008, Sarah Rich graduated from California State University, Chico, where she majored in news-editorial journalism and minored in sociology. Since 2010, Sarah has written for Government Technology magazine and covers a spectrum of public-sector IT topics, including cloud computing, transparency, broadband, and other innovative projects and trends. She currently lives in Sacramento, Calif.