IE 11 Not Supported

For optimal browsing, we recommend Chrome, Firefox or Safari browsers.
Ben Miller

Ben Miller

Associate Editor of GT Data and Business

Ben Miller is the associate editor of data and business for Government Technology. His reporting experience includes breaking news, business, community features and technical subjects. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in journalism from the Reynolds School of Journalism at the University of Nevada, Reno, and lives in Sacramento, Calif.

While Zencity has traditionally given local governments a way to listen to constituents, Civil Space offers tools to open a two-way dialogue between them — pushing Zencity down the continuum of engagement.
While the lion's share of the funding available to state government in the just-passed bipartisan infrastructure bill will be dished out based on formulas, the majority of the grant programs will be competitive.
The device, called the Raven, is going through beta testing now and will launch for general sales in January. It’s designed to detect gunshots, as well as other sounds such as glass breaking, and activate nearby cameras.
Most state CIOs expect remote work to continue and for digital services to keep proliferating. That introduces a host of shifting priorities, including a renewed need for cybersecurity enhancements and identity tools.
The company, a major biometric identification vendor for law enforcement, hopes that by putting the technology in the hands of more agencies it will make the whole practice of fingerprint matching more useful.
StateRAMP made it easier for companies that are already in the FedRAMP marketplace to get in, and the initial list is made up mostly of FedRAMP vendors. Here are the companies that have made the leap.
With residents clamoring for services and information, many agencies turned to chatbots during the pandemic. But aside from simply gaining momentum in adoption, it seems government use of the technology is also maturing.
While tech makes up a minority of spending for local governments that received federal COVID relief funds, it has pushed many toward modernization, cybersecurity and digital service efforts, a new survey has found.
State, local, territorial and tribal entities have used $150 billion from the Coronavirus Relief Fund — part of the CARES Act — for many things. But with the Dec. 31 deadline approaching, some still have a lot left.
There's momentum — and funding — behind improving state and local government cybersecurity like never before. But as leaders ponder how to use it, they should remember that security is not about the latest slick tool.
The startup is emulating the more precise, costlier digital twins that small water utilities can’t afford. The idea is that even with less precision, the product will help utilities act faster to deliver clean water.
The new features allow police to, among other things, upload a photo of a vehicle from a private camera and then search for that vehicle on the agency’s cameras. And it can find vehicles based on more than just a plate.
State and local governments are set to receive billions if the legislation passes, including funding to support cybersecurity, broadband, transit, roads, water and more. Here are the details.
The startup’s roots are in hooking up fire agencies with building data. But in five years, it’s expanded into other areas of IT and dipped into EMS and police, too. With new investment, it hopes to double its headcount.
The company has its roots in a pioneering Oregon program that charges drivers based on mileage rather than fuel. Its technology can also be used for tolling, congestion pricing and other forward-looking concepts.
Intentional or not, untrue information propagating on the Internet threatens democratic institutions and the public good. Emerging tech tools aim to help government combat the threat.
The startup has more than doubled its customer count during the pandemic as governments look for ways to stay in tune with residents. Now its investors are doubling down and Zencity is planning a new survey product.
OpenGov is acquiring ProcureNow, a five-year-old startup, in order to expand its offerings so government customers can run budgeting, procurement and financial operations all using the same vendor.
The move will give Granicus a variety of tools for collecting public sentiment — polling and surveys, website analytics, etc. — as well as tools to understand that data and personalize user experiences.
GovQA, a company that makes software to help public agencies with records requests, has put out a report measuring the difficulty of the job over time, using data from its customers. Here's what they found.
The company's founder, Lisa Abeyta, pointed to the COVID-19 pandemic — which hit just as it was about to be acquired — as the main reason for CityLife's end. It kept its customers' apps running for a year afterward.
Five years ago, a report from the municipal website builder OpenCities found many ways local governments needed to improve. Now a follow-up finds that they’ve improved in some areas, but still have plenty of work to do.
GovQA, which sells software to help the public sector handle public records requests, is putting out a quarterly index to benchmark how difficult the job is. By their measure, complexity has more than doubled since 2018.
One mobile app is focused on public-sector employees and contractors, while the other app is meant for residents. Here's how one gov tech startup is putting a spin on chatbots using geofences.
The company, a spinoff from Google-affiliated Sidewalk Labs, hopes to circumvent privacy concerns by making location-based data “synthetic.” It’s also planning on putting out a new scenario-modeling product this year.
The nation's water utilities have three years to do something most of them haven't done before: inventory their lead pipes. Doing so will take a lot of work, so one startup is offering tools to help organize the effort.
Cybersecurity is only becoming a more urgent and important need as time goes on. Now CivicPlus, which has thousands of local government customers, is bringing on a partner dedicated just to that challenge.
The new software combines a huge database for verifying identity with AI-powered tools meant to comb them, looking for fraud and irregularities. And it's found an early user in California, which was at the center of a massive unemployment insurance fraud scheme last year.
One is a giant, publicly-traded company. The other is a two-year-old startup. Together, they're putting out a solution that seeks to help local government speed up bus systems by keeping dedicated lanes clear.
While still processing the largest corporate buyout in its history, Tyler Technologies is acquiring two more companies. ReadySub helps schools find substitute teachers, while DataSpec deals in veterans’ benefit claims.