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Daniel Castro1

Daniel Castro

Contributing Writer

Daniel Castro is the vice president of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) and director of the Center for Data Innovation. Before joining ITIF, he worked at the Government Accountability Office where he audited IT security and management controls.
 

Especially as autonomous vehicles become more common on city streets, it's in everyone's interest for states to offer fully digital e-titles to decrease costs, streamline processing and reduce fraud risk.
Although digitizing government has become easier, the amount of unstructured data agencies hold remains a steep barrier to full transparency. Artificial intelligence could be the answer.
Fax machines have largely disappeared from private-sector offices, yet remain in many state and local government agencies. Eliminating them will not only save money, but also push forward digital services.
More AI tools are becoming available to help recruit and hire new technology staff. They take some of the burden off management to find the right people and also reduce bias in the process.
The ability to verify online that someone is who they say they are is critical for an increasingly digital world. While a federal solution would be ideal, state-issued digital licenses are a move in the right direction.
When the rush for unemployment insurance crashed government websites in 2020, we learned how to navigate traffic surges in a crisis. So why weren’t sites prepared to handle vaccine appointments?
The use of robots from companies like Starship Technologies for last-mile deliveries skyrocketed during the COVID-19 pandemic, and legislators would do well to make them easier to deploy on city sidewalks.
Data from marginalized communities is often underreported, meaning their needs are hidden from policymakers. President Biden’s initial actions on equitable data pave a path for state and local governments to follow.
With future elections likely to divide along stark partisan lines, and election security in question, end-to-end verifiability can let voters know that their ballots have been received and not tampered with.
Work from home was at first a temporary pandemic solution, but as public and private organizations alike make remote work permanent, they’ll need to make adjustments to more than just where staff are located.