Accela, Esri and Microsoft Partner on Local Government Data

The combination of Accela’s permitting platform, Esri’s geospatial data software and Microsoft’s data analytics will give governments the ability to find ideal locations for businesses based on traffic and other factors.

by / November 19, 2019
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Accela today announced a more extensive integration with Esri’s geographic information system software and Microsoft’s data analytics tool, Power BI, giving customers of the permit-software company a toolset to find ideal locations for new businesses.

According to a news release, where the three systems used to work side by side with one another, customers will now be able to access their respective cloud analytics and spatial data systems in all of Accela’s SaaS products. That means that state and local governments using Accela’s civic platform, for example, can review code enforcement activities, health regulations, zoning, traffic patterns and permit requirements of particular sites, and provide those to a small business owner looking for the right place to open up shop. Cities can also identify and predict possible issues based on those metrics.

The news release said these capabilities would be available by mid-2020.

“Our relationship with Accela and Microsoft leverages deep domain expertise across government technology, cloud analytics, and geographic information system (GIS) framework, making a significant step forward towards the future of govtech capabilities,” said Christian Carlson, Esri’s director of state, local and provincial government. “Never before have agencies had access to this kind of rich and extensive data. Our vision is that our collective capabilities can empower governments to make data-driven and outcome-oriented decisions to better serve their citizens.”

Andrew Westrope Staff Writer

Andrew Westrope is a staff writer for Government Technology. Before that, he was a reporter and editor at community newspapers for seven years. He has a Bachelor’s degree in physiology from Michigan State University and lives in Northern California.


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