Google Launches 'Made with Code' to Help Girls Learn to Build Technology

In a post on Google's official blog, YouTube Chief Executive Susan Wojcicki shared a common concern for many women in tech: that there are "far too few young girls" pursuing similar careers.

by Andrea Chang, McClatchy News Service / June 24, 2014

Google wants to see more girls building technology and has launched Made with Code, an initiative to help them do it.

In a post on Google's official blog, YouTube Chief Executive Susan Wojcicki shared a common concern for many women in tech: that there are "far too few young girls" pursuing similar careers. Less than 1% of high school girls, she said, express interest in majoring in computer science.

"This is an issue that hits home for me," Wojcicki said. "My school-age daughter instinctively knows how to play games, watch videos and chat with friends online. She understands technology. And she likes using technology. But she never expressed any interest in creating it herself."

Google now wants to tackle that problem. Made with Code, launched Thursday, wants to inspire girls to code and includes introductory coding projects and a commitment of $50 million over three years to support programs that can help get more women into computer science.

Made with Code launched with partners Chelsea Clinton, Mindy Kaling, MIT Media Lab and the National Center for Women & Information Technology, among others.

It will include collaborations with organizations such as the Girl Scouts of the USA and Girls Inc. to introduce Made with Code to girls in their networks. Girls and their parents will have a resource directory they can use to find more information about local events, camps, classes and clubs. The program will also reward teachers who support girls who take computer science courses on Codecademy or Khan Academy.

"I think coding is cool, but most girls don't," actress and comedian Kaling said in a statement. "Made with Code lets girls see coding not just as something they can do, but something they'd love to do."

©2014 the Los Angeles Times

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