IE 11 Not Supported

For optimal browsing, we recommend Chrome, Firefox or Safari browsers.

Are You Reaching ALL the Leaders Influencing Your Technology Procurement?

Government buying decisions are made by groups. Don’t neglect the multiple points of purchasing influence in the procurement process. This factor is overlooked by most tech companies.

Reaching All Leaders Header
Government buying decisions are made by groups. Don’t neglect the multiple points of purchasing influence in the procurement process. This factor is overlooked by most tech companies.

State and local IT procurements are influenced by both technology and business leaders within an agency. All too often, companies focus only on the CIOs or their technology team.

Overlooked are the business leaders — governors, mayors and agency executives — who set the overall objectives and budgets. Sales opportunities are missed and deals fail because companies are not addressing these critical influencers.

How do you talk ‘tech’ with non-tech influencers like elected officials?

At the next 10 Laws of Government Sales and Marketing webcast on April 18, Bill Leighty, former chief of staff for Virginia governors Tim Kaine and Mark Warner, will be providing real-world insight into how elected officials and business leaders shape technology purchasing decisions. Leighty and our panel of experts will explore the different roles in gov tech procurement, discuss the buyer’s perspective, review a sales and marketing program targeted to multiple stakeholders and answer your most pressing questions LIVE. Register here for this free, information-packed event.

Special Projects
Sponsored Articles
  • How the State of Washington teamed with Deloitte to move to a Red Hat footprint within 100 days.
  • The State of Michigan’s Department of Technology, Management, and Budget (DTMB) reduced its application delivery times to get digital services to citizens faster.

  • Sponsored
    Like many governments worldwide, the City and County of Denver, Colorado, had to act quickly to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. To support more than 15,000 employees working from home, the government sought to adapt its new collaboration tool, Microsoft Teams. By automating provisioning and scaling tasks with Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform, an agentless, human-readable automation tool, Denver supported 514% growth in Teams use and quickly launched a virtual emergency operations center (EOC) for government leaders to respond to the pandemic.
  • Sponsored
    Microsoft Teams quickly became the business application of choice as state and local governments raced to equip remote teams and maintain business continuity during the COVID-19 lockdown. But in the rush to deploy Teams, many organizations overlook, ignore or fail to anticipate some of the administrative hurdles to successful adoption. As more organizations have matured their use of Teams, a set of lessons learned has emerged to help agencies ensure a successful Teams rollout – or correct course on existing implementations.