IE 11 Not Supported

For optimal browsing, we recommend Chrome, Firefox or Safari browsers.

Nevada Community Preps for New Fiber Internet Option

Fiber Internet is on its way to Spring Creek, fulfilling a promise made two years ago by CC Communications, which has a lengthy history in Nevada, starting with telegraph services in 1889 with a $975 check.

fiber
(TNS) — Fiber internet is on its way to Spring Creek, fulfilling a promise made to the residents two years ago.

Mark Feest, CEO of CC Communications, recalled the day he approached the Spring Creek Association Board of Directors at their meeting on Aug. 27, 2019.

At the time, CC was one of three vying broadband companies — along with SafeLink (now Anthem Broadband) and Choice Broadband — chosen for a closer look by the association as it sought a solution to residents’ internet problems.

Feest outlined a plan to lay fiber optic cable in the trench carved out by Southwest Gas Corp. for its Spring Creek expansion. He also promised the SCA would not be obligated to pay any subsidy costs as the cable entered the homeowners association.

“We would not be asking to pay rent if we were on your property,” Feest told the board at the time. He also explained that his company had expanded to other parts of the state, “and we have a good handle on our cost.”

CC Communications has a lengthy history in Nevada, starting with telegraph services in 1889 with a $975 check from Churchill County Commissioners. Seven years later, telephone lines were installed in place of the telegraph lines.

As time went on, technology improved the phone lines for Churchill County Telephone, and the company entered the cellular market in 1990. Five years later, it adapted again for the burgeoning internet and changed its name to CC Communications.

Although slowed down by the pandemic, Feest said bringing broadband to Spring Creek and surrounding communities, including Elko and Elko Summit Estates, took extra time but was worth it.

“With the help of NNE, a longtime contractor and local to Elko, I think we have the ability to execute the program in a rapid manner,” Feest said.

NNE Director Sam Ballard said his company has a “good working relationship” with CC Communications. “We’re excited to bring that service here, to expand internet capabilities. We hold CC Communications in high regard.”

“We know all of the people we’ve talked to are excited,” said Jay Lingenfelter, the operations supervisor for CC Communications. He said he worked with Ballard for 20 years

Weston Williams, NNE project manager and Spring Creek Association resident, called it “exciting” and a “privilege” in bringing “members of our community high-speed internet.”

On July 28, CC Communications kicked off the first phase to supply broadband in Spring Creek. The company, along with NNE Construction, began the process of installing the backbone: a large, orange conduit that provides fiber-optic service to each of the association’s four subdivisions — Marina Hills, Tract 100; Vista Grande, Tract 200; Sunset Ridge, Tract 300; and Palace Heights, Tract 400 — as well as Pleasant Valley Estates.

Finding a solution to the internet problem was welcomed by Tom Hannum, SCA director at-large. He was on hand at the groundbreaking in the Vista Grande section on Brent Drive.

“We’re happy to see some faster internet come into the Spring Creek area,” Hannum said.

“I live out near Lamoille, and I’ve seen the progress,” said County Commissioner Rex Steninger. “It’s been very impressive, and we’re fully in support of their efforts to bring service to Spring Creek.”

County Commission Chairman Jon Karr said that the internet is less of a luxury and has become a daily necessity.

“We’ve all struggled with extremely slow and unreliable internet,” Karr said. “Now internet is kind of like natural gas, electricity. It’s more of a utility now.”

Striving to be a community partner, CC Communications is involved with Spring Creek events such as the Freedom Festival and as a major donor to the Boys & Girls Club of Spring Creek.

Since introducing CC Communications to Spring Creek, the company has expanded into Elko, with The Star Hotel becoming the company's first Downtown customer.

The Villas at Riverside apartment complex was the newest residential area to receive broadband in the past few weeks.

“They are ready to be hooked up immediately,” Feest said.

After initially seeking grand funding from the City Council, CC Communications will partner with Elko County and apply for a fixed broadband service grant.

CC Communications will ask for $7.35 million, 40% of the company’s $18.37 million project costs, the rest to be shouldered by the broadband company.

But Feest hasn’t forgotten the promise he made two years ago to help Spring Creek solve homeowners’ and businesses’ internet issues.

“It’s a big day for Spring Creek,” Feest said. “It’s expanding, and we’re excited to bring it to this community.”

© 2021 Elko Daily Free Press, Nev. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Tags:

Network
Special Projects
Sponsored Articles
  • Sponsored
    How the convergence of security and networking is accelerating government agencies journey to the cloud.
  • Sponsored
    How the State of Washington teamed with Deloitte to move to a Red Hat footprint within 100 days.
  • Sponsored
    The State of Michigan’s Department of Technology, Management, and Budget (DTMB) reduced its application delivery times to get digital services to citizens faster.

  • Sponsored
    Like many governments worldwide, the City and County of Denver, Colorado, had to act quickly to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. To support more than 15,000 employees working from home, the government sought to adapt its new collaboration tool, Microsoft Teams. By automating provisioning and scaling tasks with Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform, an agentless, human-readable automation tool, Denver supported 514% growth in Teams use and quickly launched a virtual emergency operations center (EOC) for government leaders to respond to the pandemic.