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How many times will you likely be able to drop your next phone before it breaks?

Answer: 15 times.

Though that’s only an average, it’s still an impressive one.

Digital Trends reports that Corning just revealed the latest version of its Gorilla Glass, which is used to cover the displays of most flagship smartphones from Apple, Samsung and more. With smartphones moving toward increasingly glass-dominated designs, including their backs, a more durable product is all but a necessity.

Gorilla Glass 6 is allegedly twice as durable as its predecessor Gorilla Glass 5, which could only withstand an average of 11 drops from 1 meter (3.3 feet) before being likely to break. According to Corning, people drop their phones an average of seven times a year, so the new Gorilla Glass should survive two years, at which point many upgrade to a new device anyway.

Kate is a senior copy editor in Northern California. She holds a bachelor's degree in English with a minor in professional writing from the University of California, Davis.
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