Prince William County, Va., Names Robert Mancini as CIO

Virginia's third largest county lured Mancini, an industry veteran with 30 years in IT and 12 years in local government, out of the private sector to head up its IT operations.

by / April 11, 2017
David Kidd/e.Republic

More than a month after former CIO Tom McQuillan retired, Prince William County, Va., announced on Tuesday, April 11, that IT veteran Robert Mancini will return from the private sector to lead its Department of Information Technology.

The Board of County Supervisors for the state’s third largest county made the announcement after a competitive hiring process and a nationwide search.

Mancini has 30 years of experience in IT and 12 years in local government, the county said in a news release. For the last two years, however, he was CIO at Lexington Technology, and described the Pennsylvania company as a “$2 billion pharmaceutical firm” on his LinkedIn feed.

At Lexington, Mancini “executed a critical turnaround plan” for its IT division; negotiated service contracts, introduced service level agreements and initiated "programs that increased productivity while reducing attrition,” according to the news release.

On LinkedIn, Mancini described the contribution as transforming “an IT division from being a weakness to being recognized as the driving force behind the firm reaching its target goal of $2 billion in revenue.” On April 11, his profile still listed him as CIO at Lexington.

In it, he described himself as a “passionate CIO who gets IT on point” for organizations seeking “maximum business value and superior results.”

Before Lexington, Mancini held several positions in D.C. government for more than 11 years.

Most recently he had been CTO for a little over four years, creating the Digital Inclusion Initiative to expand broadband access in underserved areas of the city; developing the D.C. Centralized Technology Procurement team; and forging public-private partnerships with cybersecurity entities. He left that role in January 2015.

Corey A. Stewart, chairman of the board of county supervisors, highlighted Mancini’s experience and expertise in a statement.

"He has implemented several successful technology programs in the public and private sectors alike," Stewart said, "and we are confident that he will serve our community and the organization well."

Mancini said he is “thrilled” to return to public service.

"I want to thank the Board of County Supervisors and reinforce my commitment to deliver innovative technology-based strategies and solutions that will best serve Prince William County,” he said in a statement.

McQuillan had been in county government for seven years when he announced his retirement as CIO in early January.