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The Future in Context

The former Rust Belt state is betting its future on a sought-after natural resource — people — guided by one person in particular. Hilary Doe, the first state chief growth officer anywhere, discusses what’s next.
As ridership continues to lag amid a stubbornly slow recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, cities experiment with free rides and micromobility to prove public transit’s worth in worsening financial conditions.
A former mayor of Compton, Calif., who oversaw the country’s largest experiment with universal basic income, thinks a new software platform can help bootstrap underserved communities.
Eric Goldman, associate dean of research at Santa Clara University School of Law, assesses concerns around the impending TikTok ban or buyout. It faces significant First Amendment challenges, he said.
The assessment and educational tool offers insights and solutions for improving government web performance. Based on its criteria, many state and federal agencies have updated their sites.
From digital inclusion to AI innovation, we take a closer look at Government Technology’s honorees in the 23rd year of its annual awards. In conversation with editorial staff, we focus on the work of five particular leaders.
With a crowd of more than 900 people, the NASCIO Midyear Conference buzzed with energy about generative artificial intelligence, along with concern that humans remain in charge.
The rise of generative artificial intelligence is a stress test for data governance and management, and an opportunity for data stewards to shine.
Reducing traffic deaths is a compelling proposition, but it gets complicated when trying to make it so.
A 50-state investigation in data journalism suggests the answer is, not yet. The AI agent was insightful on a number of fronts; but, while not descending into hallucinations, its mind strayed from instructions as the experiment went on.
Cities and states are working on novel solutions to old, intractable problems. Governing magazine’s return to print showcases stories of the people who are making them work across the country.
Complete bans, age verification and new online tools are in play as government, the tech industry and parents contend for influence and control in determining how to keep minors safe online.
Faced with increasing traffic and declining gas tax revenue, policymakers and city planners are taking another look at dynamic pricing. If you love buying airline and concert tickets, they have got a deal for you.
Work is well underway in jurisdictions across the country to prepare for the next generation of doing the public’s business.
The co-author of a new book suggests that when technology, data and collective effort converge, government, the tech industry and higher education can tackle major challenges while bringing a new generation into the workforce.
Mental health, climate and workforce are at the core of a complex cluster of issues confronting lawmakers in this year.
In a discussion about the near future, the writers and editors at Governing walk through the legislative issues to keep an eye on this year. Technology, budget and transportation top the list.
A recap of 2023's pivotal trends in gov tech: transportation transitions, cybersecurity challenges and strides in digital inclusivity.
This time next year, Americans will be casting votes in the 2024 general election. State and local races (and issues) will take place in the long shadow of a carefully watched presidential rematch.
From inhaler watches to redesigned crutches: How a unique summer program in Birmingham is pushing boundaries in STEM education.
State and local government PIOs and social media teams are navigating the drastic changes at what was once Twitter, grappling with unexpected features and shifts in user verification, as they weigh the pros and cons of remaining on the evolving platform.
Human-centered design can go a long way toward fixing some of society’s biggest problems, including missteps in trying to make things better by applying technology alone.
Tools like ChatGPT are being heralded as a critical underpinning of a 21st-century education or feared as the death knell of creativity. Either way, educators increasingly realize they can’t ignore AI.
Equipped with publicly available data and an interest in making a difference, a 14-year-old self-taught coder is doing for government what it did not do for itself.