Noelle Knell

Noelle Knell

Editor

Government Technology editor Noelle Knell has more than 15 years of writing and editing experience, covering public projects, transportation, business and technology. A California native, she has worked in both state and local government, and is a graduate of the University of California, Davis, with majors in political science and American history. She can be reached via email and on Twitter.

This group of innovative and visionary IT professionals marks the 20th year of GovTech’s Top 25 awards, who in a most unconventional year continued the critical work of making government better.
Former Director, Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency
Government is tasked with the hefty responsibility of doing the people’s business, but what happens when people can’t access services or online systems fail?
On the second day of the virtual NASCIO conference, state CIOs discussed the tech that enabled the quick shift to remote work, whether any of it will stick and how the pandemic will affect digital transformation plans.
As NASCIO Midyear goes virtual, state technology chiefs from Tennessee, Massachusetts and Washington share their COVID-19 pivots, what weaknesses were exposed and the foundations being laid for a new normal.
This year’s class of Government Technology’s Top 25 Doers, Dreamers and Drivers is an impressive group of IT leaders working in and alongside government to improve how the public sector works.
Modernization, cybersecurity and transparency will drive major tech investments in cities, counties and states across the country. In Washington, D.C., experts broke down how an estimated $111 billion will be spent in 2020.
Alex Braszko, on the job since May 2019, points to the formation of an Emerging Technology Board to guide innovation work as a major achievement during his brief tenure as chief innovation officer.
Hiring a chief data officer last year helped kick off some transformational data work in the commonwealth of Kentucky, according to Chief Information Officer Chuck Grindle. Here, he outlines their progress so far.
Adding new data sources, like from emergency management systems, for example, is helping Kentucky continue to get smarter about how it directs its resources in the fight against the opioid epidemic.
Chief Information Officer David Cagigal says Wisconsin has a responsibility to help locals with cybersecurity. But the state has its own unique pressure related to the Democratic Convention in Milwaukee next July.
Massachusetts CIO Curt Wood is eager to explore ways new technologies can be incorporated into the enterprise, but current procurement processes aren’t set up to easily adapt to new vendors offering the latest tech.
Ron Guerrier leads the relatively new Innovation and Technology Department, but before he can get to work on the technology stack, he has to establish a cohesive departmental culture and understand existing processes.
Described by CIO Nelson Moe as “groundbreaking” in 2005, the commonwealth has severed its relationship with its former mega-contractor that limited Virginia’s agility in meeting today’s IT needs.
Wisconsin CIO David Cagigal is committed to the mainframe, at least for the next couple years. His challenge is making sure agencies are on the same page about the timing of their exit strategies.
Acknowledging a surge in “malicious traffic” a few weeks ago, Maine Chief Information Officer Fred Brittain outlines his layered strategy for managing cyberthreats in his small state.
At NASCIO, Commonwealth Chief Information Officer Chuck Grindle explained that there are three elements of his strategy to make Kentucky and its technology as resilient as possible in the years ahead.
At the second annual Chicago Digital Government Summit this week, public-sector data experts shared common challenges that government should prepare for in creating and running data programs.
Downers Grove Sanitary District Administrative Supervisor Clay Campbell and San Antonio Water System VP and CIO Sree Pulapaka are among those recognized in the 2019 class of Top 25 Doers, Dreamers and Drivers.
Government Technology’s annual Top 25 Doers, Dreamers and Drivers awards honor individuals and teams who are working to make the public sector more efficient, data-driven and equitable for government and citizens alike.
In 2019, $107.6 billion in technology spending is projected for state and local governments in the U.S. At the Beyond the Beltway event in Washington, D.C., chief information officers talked about what they have planned.
in 2019, $109 billion in technology spending is projected for state and local governments in the U.S. At the Beyond the Beltway event in Washington, D.C., chief information officers talked about what they have planned.
One of the longest-serving chief innovation officers in government known for his passion for making Kansas City "smart," Bennett is returning to the private sector as Mayor Sly James nears the end of his second term.
County CIO Tim Dupuis said the move to a renovated historic building in downtown Oakland has generated opportunities to improve operations as well as encourage collaboration, allowing staff to connect in new ways.
The state’s chief privacy officer, Ted Cotterill, talked recently to Government Technology about standard contract terms that ensure third-party vendors protect data privacy in the age of cloud computing.
Morgan Reed, CIO for Arizona, says the state wants to deliver streamlined services to citizens, but it’s not there yet. The state is currently seeking a partner to help establish a one-stop shop for online services.
A new partnership using interns from Norwich University in Northfield, Vt., will move Vermont to a 24/7 cybersecurity operation, according to state Chief Information Officer John Quinn.
State technology leaders like Colorado Chief Technology Officer David McCurdy and California Chief Information Officer Amy Tong had plenty to say about roadblocks on the path to digital transformation.
Colorado Chief Technology Officer David McCurdy says there’s no amount of cybersecurity funding that ensures 100 percent protection from cyberthreats, but he believes the state is on the right track.