Noelle Knell

Noelle Knell

Editor

Government Technology editor Noelle Knell has more than 15 years of writing and editing experience, covering public projects, transportation, business and technology. A California native, she has worked in both state and local government, and is a graduate of the University of California, Davis, with majors in political science and American history. She can be reached via email and on Twitter.

Now that the dust is settling after the rush to pivot to remote work for as many public-sector staff as possible, tech leaders look at what a hybrid workforce future may hold for state and local government.

Jason Clarke, chief information officer of Delaware since November 2020, explains the pandemic’s impact on state jobs, what employees’ work will look like going forward and where Delaware stands on broadband.
NASCIO Midyear wraps up with a look at the new reality of part remote, part in-person work, as well as an exploration of the massive gains in digital service delivery during the pandemic.
Technology leaders in California, Colorado and Minnesota convened at NASCIO to offer best practices on bridging connectivity and digital literacy gaps in their states.
At the virtual convening of the National Association of State Chief Information Officers this week, sessions looked ahead to improving how states will continue to serve agencies and citizens in a post-pandemic world.
This group of innovative and visionary IT professionals marks the 20th year of GovTech’s Top 25 awards, who in a most unconventional year continued the critical work of making government better.
Former Director, Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency
Government is tasked with the hefty responsibility of doing the people’s business, but what happens when people can’t access services or online systems fail?
Six years of tracking the growing gov tech market have proven that not only is it a viable space for innovation and investment, but that companies built to serve government have become essential.
While the year that was 2020 immediately conjures words like “challenge,” “hardship” and “crisis,” there are lessons to be gleaned that offer important perspective as we approach the New Year.
Jessica Tisch, commissioner of the New York City Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications, explains how she pivoted to address the pandemic while maintaining and modernizing the massive city’s systems.
The changes wrought by the pandemic have underscored the need for creative, flexible leaders who expect the same from their technology. So perhaps it isn’t surprising that as-a-service technologies have met this moment.
In the past year, a dozen new state chief information officers have taken up their roles, many amid the early throes of the COVID-19 pandemic. Here's what they're up to in the months ahead.
As chief information officer of the country’s fourth most populous county, Ed Winfield has had to balance priorities like an ongoing technology refresh with the new curve balls the coronavirus has added to his plate.
The adjustment to life in a pandemic has not been easy, but it has shown that public-sector work is not only vital, but also flexible, and that IT has a critical role to play in ensuring organizational resilience.
On the second day of the virtual NASCIO conference, state CIOs discussed the tech that enabled the quick shift to remote work, whether any of it will stick and how the pandemic will affect digital transformation plans.
As NASCIO Midyear goes virtual, state technology chiefs from Tennessee, Massachusetts and Washington share their COVID-19 pivots, what weaknesses were exposed and the foundations being laid for a new normal.
This year’s class of Government Technology’s Top 25 Doers, Dreamers and Drivers is an impressive group of IT leaders working in and alongside government to improve how the public sector works.
Sam Liccardo, Mayor; Rob Lloyd, CIO; Dolan Beckel, Director of the Office of Civic Innovation; Kip Harkness, Deputy City Manager; Shireen Santosham, Former Chief Innovation Officer
Modernization, cybersecurity and transparency will drive major tech investments in cities, counties and states across the country. In Washington, D.C., experts broke down how an estimated $111 billion will be spent in 2020.
Blockchain architects, analytics officers and reinvention officers now work alongside CIOs, CTOs and CDOs. Here are the newer tech-related roles in state and local government that caught our eye.
Millennials now outnumber baby boomers in the public-sector workforce, and IT is no exception. Leaders must work with HR and create incentives and pathways to keep the next generation engaged and on board.
Alex Braszko, on the job since May 2019, points to the formation of an Emerging Technology Board to guide innovation work as a major achievement during his brief tenure as chief innovation officer.
Our first issue of the new year looks at where government technology has been, where it’s going and offers perspective on the growing ecosystem of private industry that has formed around public-sector IT.
Hiring a chief data officer last year helped kick off some transformational data work in the commonwealth of Kentucky, according to Chief Information Officer Chuck Grindle. Here, he outlines their progress so far.
Adding new data sources, like from emergency management systems, for example, is helping Kentucky continue to get smarter about how it directs its resources in the fight against the opioid epidemic.
Chief Information Officer David Cagigal says Wisconsin has a responsibility to help locals with cybersecurity. But the state has its own unique pressure related to the Democratic Convention in Milwaukee next July.
Massachusetts CIO Curt Wood is eager to explore ways new technologies can be incorporated into the enterprise, but current procurement processes aren’t set up to easily adapt to new vendors offering the latest tech.
Ron Guerrier leads the relatively new Innovation and Technology Department, but before he can get to work on the technology stack, he has to establish a cohesive departmental culture and understand existing processes.