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Data

    Data-driven reporting and analysis from Government Technology writers and editors.

    GovQA, a company that makes software to help public agencies with records requests, has put out a report measuring the difficulty of the job over time, using data from its customers. Here's what they found.
    Five years ago, a report from the municipal website builder OpenCities found many ways local governments needed to improve. Now a follow-up finds that they’ve improved in some areas, but still have plenty of work to do.
    The nationwide communications network for public safety has come a long way since it started operating in 2018. New numbers from AT&T, the company hired to build out the network, illustrate how it continues to grow.
    With little assistance from the federal government, state and local jurisdictions have shed hundreds of thousands of jobs. Now those trends have plateaued as vaccines make their way out to their first recipients.
    A report finds that micromobility grew quickly from 2018 to 2019, though it remains concentrated in relatively few cities. Local governments have also found ways to curb problems such as improper parking and inequity.
    While most sectors saw month-over-month growth in employment, the government continued losing workers in the latest jobs report — a trend not unexpected given agencies' reliance on tax and fee revenue.
    Several states have established bodies to study blockchain technology in the past several years. They range from departmental groups with report deadlines to policy groups meant to bring forward bill ideas.
    In our series examining the impacts of body cameras, we conclude by looking at how different policies can influence outcomes, and why some problems are just too deep to be solved by technology alone.
    As government collects more citizen data and cyberattacks increase in frequency, states are hiring chief privacy officers to keep all that data secure. Here’s a data-driven look at who’s doing the job and where.
    A city's purchasing threshold can determine whether buying something involves calling up a few people for quotes or spending a year trudging through a rigid contracting process. So where's the line?