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Georgia DOT, Partners Build Upon Connected Vehicle Project

A vehicle-to-everything project deployed on The Ray, a highway technology testbed in rural Georgia, will add roadside communication units and in-vehicle technology to improve communications and highway safety.

Computer graphic showing connected vehicles on a roadway.
A vehicle-to-everything (V2X) project in rural Georgia will add roadside units and in-vehicle technology to improve communications and highway safety.
Shutterstock/metamorworks
Georgia is moving forward with a second phase of a connected vehicle project, expanding the area covered and partnering with car maker Kia to outfit Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) vehicles with vehicle-to-everything (V2X) technology.

The project, which uses Panasonic technology on an 18-mile stretch of Interstate 85, known as The Ray, will add seven new roadside communications radio units and 10 additional connected vehicles. The autos will be equipped with heads-up displays to deliver “traveler information messages” related to traffic conditions, construction zones and information to help improve highway safety.

“This project puts citizens’ safety first by utilizing performance-based management, innovation and public-private-philanthropic partnerships to deliver safer, smarter and more efficient infrastructure for Georgians,” said GDOT Commissioner Russell R. McMurry in a statement.

The expansion of the pilot is a continuation of a 2019 project which involved six roadside units along The Ray, a transportation technology testbed. Four GDOT vehicles based in the area were equipped with the onboard technology to send speed, location and direction data, along with various bits of info about vehicle operations such as windshield wipers or hard braking.

The project uses the “Cirrus by Panasonic” data management platform, which has also been used in Utah and Colorado.
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