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Quantum Computing

Stories about the intersection of government and quantum computing as that emerging field continues to evolve.

We’ve been hearing about upcoming breakthroughs with quantum computing technology for several years, so what’s the latest from around the world?
The Chicago Quantum Exchange this week unveiled a network for sharing information between four universities and two national laboratories that could produce breakthroughs in cybersecurity, medicine and climate change.
A new memorandum instructs CISA to “engage with” state and local governments by late fall about quantum computing risks. Federal officials, meanwhile, are looking for new ways to build a quantum-focused workforce.
Gov. JB Pritzker has proclaimed April as “Innovation and Technology Month” in the state as part of an effort to highlight technological achievements in quantum computing and support education and workforce growth.
Albany Law professor Rob Heverly says scholars, industry leaders and government regulators need to start pondering quantum Internet regulations, and discussions should be informed by lessons of the past.
Quantum computing strong enough to break traditional encryption methods is looming on the horizon — and federal officials want state and local governments to start planning for that future now.
The National Institute of Standards and Technology has published a request for information in the Federal Register about the use of emerging technologies in both the public and private sectors.
Through a $20 million partnership with quantum computing company IonQ, university students, faculty and researchers will have access to a commercial-grade quantum computer for the development of new applications.
The next generation of quantum technology is emerging from research labs and into commercialization, with the Denver and Boulder area attracting early leaders in the space such as Honeywell Quantum Solutions.