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Versaterm Buys Forensic Software Provider JusticeTrax

The latest deal for the Canada-based emergency response tech vendor brings in software to help law enforcement agencies keep better tabs on evidence. The move comes amid other such deals in the emergency services space.

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Versaterm Public Safety is expanding its law enforcement technology offerings via the acquisition of JusticeTrax, an Arizona-based firm that focuses on forensic case management software.

The move represents not only the latest acquisition for Versaterm but illustrates how technology providers are increasingly working to offer a fuller suite of services to local and state emergency responders.

Versaterm, based in Canada, did not disclose terms of the deal but said it will enable it to help support more law enforcement agencies not only in North America but the Caribbean, the Middle East and Australia.

Founded some 40 years ago, Versaterm said it serves more than 65,000 police, fire and medical agencies across the world with computer-aided dispatch, records management, citizen engagement and related technologies.

JusticeTrax, which began selling its software in 1995, provides laboratory information management systems (LIMS) that help law enforcement agencies with such tasks as laboratory and property room management, exhibit auditing, remote logging of evidence and similar tasks.

“JusticeTrax continues to set the standard for innovation in forensic case management software. Versaterm’s law enforcement customers and the communities they serve will now have access to the most advanced forensic laboratory software products developed by leading scientists over the past 25 years,” said Warren Loomis, Versaterm's CEO, in a press release. “In today’s environment, law enforcement agencies are facing unprecedented operational demands and we are committed to meeting their evolving needs. JusticeTrax marks our fourth acquisition this year — with each transaction enhancing the capabilities of our customers through an unmatched public safety software ecosystem.”

Just more than a month ago, in fact, Versaterm bought California-based SPIDR Tech, which launched in 2015 and whose software helps law enforcement agencies to communicate with residents via text messages, mobile surveys and email. Those residents can include 911 callers and crime victims.

This latest deal from Versaterm also comes after other acquisitions involving Adashi Systems, eJust Systems and TechVoice. Versaterm said it will integrate the JusticeTrax technology into its records management system, but also continue to sell that software as its own standalone platform across the world.

“We are excited to be joining the Versaterm family,” said Simon Key, JusticeTrax CEO, in the statement. “The inclusion of our forensic suite with Versaterm’s product platform equips customers with the most sophisticated technology applications from the crime scene to the courtroom.”
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