Micromobility Data Startup Populus Raises $5M from Investors

The company has been growing in recent years, gathering city customers around the world and expanding into curb management and street closure solutions. Now its investors are re-upping, and new ones are jumping aboard.

a scooter rider passes in front of a public transit bus
Shutterstock/Daria Stock
Populus, a startup whose software helps cities manage streets, micromobility and curbs, has raised $5 million from investors.

The company’s fundraising comes after it launched a new solution, Street Manager
, last year. That tool was meant to help cities plan and enforce shared streets, slow streets and other closure programs. On top of that, Populus delivers data on things such as e-scooter trips and curb parking demand.

Populus is working with more than 80 cities across the globe, including San Diego and Oakland, Calif., as well as Tel Aviv, according to a press release.

“Over the past few years, the world has continued to see rapid transformation in private fleets, from shared scooters to autonomous delivery,” said Regina Clewlow, the company’s CEO and co-founder, in the statement. “At Populus, we’re focused on empowering the cities we serve with data and technology to effectively manage how their streets and curbs are used.”

The latest fundraising round included participation from existing investors Precursor Ventures, Relay Ventures and Ulu Ventures. New investors included auto parts supplier Magna and Storm Ventures, which has been pushing further into gov tech.

“In recent years, there has been significant growth in venture-backed startups delivering software to cities, especially as transportation becomes increasingly connected and automated,” said Storm Ventures Partner Frederik Groce in the statement. “Populus is uniquely positioned as the market leader to support cities’ digital transformation.”

The company has raised close to $9 million total to date, according to Crunchbase.

Ben Miller is the associate editor of data and business for Government Technology. His reporting experience includes breaking news, business, community features and technical subjects. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in journalism from the Reynolds School of Journalism at the University of Nevada, Reno, and lives in Sacramento, Calif.